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Animal Kingdom Animalia (Animals)

Taxonomic Navigation -?-
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum in AnimaliaNumber of SpecimensNumber of Pictures
AnnelidaWorms and Leeches39
ArthropodaArthropods10044502
ChordataVertebrates1648
Mollusca07
Common Name
MatchCommon Name
****Animals
Pictures Below
Metazoa is the kingdom of animals. Worms are metazoans and so were the dinosaurs. Trout and mayflies are metazoans. You are probably a metazoan.

See Arthropoda for most of the invertebrates trout eat, or skip straight to the insect orders Ephemeroptera (Mayflies), Trichoptera (Caddisflies), or Plecoptera (Stoneflies), which are the three most important.

The non-arthropod classes are listed on this site only to hold pictures, so far, and I haven't put much information up yet about them.

Pictures of 1021 Animal Specimens:

Specimen Page:1234...103
Argia Damselfly NymphArgia  Damselfly Nymph View 3 PicturesMy friend Willy captured this early instar (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.) damselfly nymph and brought it to me for identification. It is more robust and stocky at this early stage than the spindly appearance of the later instars (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.), and its appearance is less familiar.
Collected August 28, 2005 from Fall Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 14, 2006
Neophylax (Autumn Mottled Sedges) Caddisfly AdultNeophylax (Autumn Mottled Sedges) Caddisfly Adult View 20 PicturesThis large caddisfly looks really neat close-up.
Collected September 19, 2006 from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on October 4, 2006
Specimen Page:1234...103

79 Streamside Pictures of Animals:

Streamside Photo Page:1234...9
These caddisflies were thick over the water in the evening on a cold, clear northwoods lake.  They were in many places on the lake, all closer to the shady shore, which also was the shore most sheltered from the wind.  I'm not sure which of those features attracted them.  In this picture: Caddisfly Genus Nectopsyche (White Millers). From Lake Owen in Wisconsin.
These caddisflies were thick over the water in the evening on a cold, clear northwoods lake. They were in many places on the lake, all closer to the shady shore, which also was the shore most sheltered from the wind. I'm not sure which of those features attracted them.

In this picture: Caddisfly Genus Nectopsyche (White Millers).
LocationLake Owen
Date TakenJun 10, 2006
Date AddedJun 30, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This Ephemerella invaria sulphur dun got stuck in its shuck trying to emerge.  This isn't exactly a "natural" pose for a photograph, but it kind of shows what an emerger pattern could look like.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun). From the Neversink River in New York.
This Ephemerella invaria sulphur dun got stuck in its shuck (
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Shuck: The shed exoskeleton left over when an insect molts into its next stage or instar. Most often it describes the last nymphal or pupal skin exited during emergence into a winged adult.
)
trying to emerge. This isn't exactly a "natural" pose for a photograph, but it kind of shows what an emerger pattern could look like.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun).
Date TakenMay 20, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Caddis on Catskill cobble.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the Beaverkill River in New York.
Caddis on Catskill cobble.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 2, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Streamside Photo Page:1234...9

131 Underwater Pictures of Animals:

Underwater Photo Page:1234...14
Hundreds of cased caddisfly larvae live on this log in a small brook trout stream.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin.
Hundreds of cased caddisfly larvae live on this log in a small brook trout stream.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Several Baetidae nymphs line up on a rock.  In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives). From Mongaup Creek in New York.
Several Baetidae nymphs line up on a rock.

In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives).
Date TakenApr 19, 2006
Date AddedApr 22, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Shown Full Size
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A Brachycentrus "Apple Caddis" pupa scoots around in the surface film.  Apparently it had some difficulty emerging, so I was able to slip my camera underneath it and take a picture from below.  In this picture: Caddisfly Species Brachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis). From the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
A Brachycentrus "Apple Caddis" pupa scoots around in the surface film. Apparently it had some difficulty emerging, so I was able to slip my camera underneath it and take a picture from below.

In this picture: Caddisfly Species Brachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis).
Date TakenApr 19, 2006
Date AddedApr 22, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Underwater Photo Page:1234...14

Recent Discussions of Animalia

Grannom vs Apple Caddis 7 Replies »
Posted by Walleye on Apr 26, 2010 in the order Trichoptera
Last reply on Jan 11, 2017 by Afishinado
While the Grannom Caddis and Apple Caddis are both from the Brachycentrus Genus, they are seperate "species". I believe much confusion is caused by some who refer to both as the "Grannom". Grannom (species: numerosus) is not the same color, nor does it hatch the same as the Apply Caddis (speicies: applachia). Pupa of the Grannom have a dirty olive, to dark olive body, with brown wing pads, and a brown shuck.They often hatch mid morning. The Apple Caddis Pupa is a light brighter olive, and a amber wing pad and amber to ginger shuck. Apple Caddis tend to hatch later in the afternoon. While size might be the same, the coloration of the adults have a completely different look. Apple Caddis adults have a very light colored wing, and a light (apple green body color). Grannom adults have a brownish wing with a body of dark olive, mixed with brown to black coloration. I have further noticed that the Grannom seem to hatch over much of the stream while Apple Caddis seem to hatch closer to shore. I'm just trying to clear up the problem of some calling both the Grannom, which leads to much confusion.
ReplyBrachycentrus americanus on the Lower Sacramento River California
Posted by Troutguide on Oct 29, 2016 in the species Brachycentrus americanus
I believe this is the species found in sometimes very large numbers on the Lower Sacramento River in the Redding area. Ten years ago it was present in such large numbers that fishing a fly on the bottom resulted in frequently hooking one of these caddis still in its case. Along with other aquatic insects their numbers have declined to a fraction of once seen. I don't believe the egg Sac dropped by the females to be olive , instread I have seen it to be a bright green. The females seem to oviposit close to the edge of flowing water and not midstream.
ReplyHex hatch water temperature range? 4 Replies »
Posted by NEMatt on May 23, 2014 in the species Hexagenia limbata
Last reply on Jul 5, 2016 by Bombillo
Hi,

New to the site - love it. I was wondering if there was a suggested range of water temperature at which the Hex likes to hatch.

Thanks
Matt
ReplyWhat is the big DEAL about the HEX? 21 Replies »
Posted by Spinner on Jun 21, 2006 in the species Hexagenia limbata
Last reply on Jul 5, 2016 by Bombillo
fishing in the dark.......
stepping in holes?

I hate the dark........

I don't need the hex........

Len
ReplySalmonfly question for you westerners 7 Replies »
Posted by Troutnut on Jul 30, 2006 in the species Pteronarcys californica
Last reply on Jun 4, 2016 by Chipper
I don't have many reliable sources about this species, so it'd be great if you western fishermen could read over the article and make sure I haven't said anything stupid or omitted anything important. I'll be happy to incorporate any additions you have.
Reply
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