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Animal Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)

Pictures Below
Arthropods include just about everything trout eat except for minnows, worms, and leeches.

Pictures of 1003 Arthropod Specimens:

Specimen Page:1234...101
Neophylax (Autumn Mottled Sedges) Caddisfly AdultNeophylax (Autumn Mottled Sedges) Caddisfly Adult View 20 PicturesThis large caddisfly looks really neat close-up.
Collected September 19, 2006 from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on October 4, 2006
Specimen Page:1234...101

79 Streamside Pictures of Arthropods:

Streamside Photo Page:1234...9
These caddisflies were thick over the water in the evening on a cold, clear northwoods lake.  They were in many places on the lake, all closer to the shady shore, which also was the shore most sheltered from the wind.  I'm not sure which of those features attracted them.  In this picture: Caddisfly Genus Nectopsyche (White Millers). From Lake Owen in Wisconsin.
These caddisflies were thick over the water in the evening on a cold, clear northwoods lake. They were in many places on the lake, all closer to the shady shore, which also was the shore most sheltered from the wind. I'm not sure which of those features attracted them.

In this picture: Caddisfly Genus Nectopsyche (White Millers).
LocationLake Owen
Date TakenJun 10, 2006
Date AddedJun 30, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
A thick mating swarm of Tricorythodes mayfly spinners hovers the West Branch of the Delaware near Hale Eddy one early fall morning.  View the picture full-size and you'll be able to make out the wings and tails on most of those little white dots.

This was one of many such clouds visible all up and down the river.  The mayflies were impressive, but the trout did not hold up their end of the bargain -- there was not a rise in sight.  In this picture: Mayfly Genus Tricorythodes (Tricos). From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
A thick mating swarm of Tricorythodes mayfly spinners hovers the West Branch of the Delaware near Hale Eddy one early fall morning. View the picture full-size and you'll be able to make out the wings and tails on most of those little white dots.

This was one of many such clouds visible all up and down the river. The mayflies were impressive, but the trout did not hold up their end of the bargain -- there was not a rise in sight.

In this picture: Mayfly Genus Tricorythodes (Tricos).
Date TakenSep 2, 2005
Date AddedFeb 8, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This Ephemerella invaria sulphur dun got stuck in its shuck trying to emerge.  This isn't exactly a "natural" pose for a photograph, but it kind of shows what an emerger pattern could look like.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun). From the Neversink River in New York.
This Ephemerella invaria sulphur dun got stuck in its shuck (
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Shuck: The shed exoskeleton left over when an insect molts into its next stage or instar. Most often it describes the last nymphal or pupal skin exited during emergence into a winged adult.
)
trying to emerge. This isn't exactly a "natural" pose for a photograph, but it kind of shows what an emerger pattern could look like.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun).
Date TakenMay 20, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Streamside Photo Page:1234...9

122 Underwater Pictures of Arthropods:

Underwater Photo Page:1234...13
Hundreds of cased caddisfly larvae live on this log in a small brook trout stream.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin.
Hundreds of cased caddisfly larvae live on this log in a small brook trout stream.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
A crayfish chews on a Hexagenia limbata nymph shortly after a small Hex emergence.  I didn't catch any fish, but playing around with my flashlight and camera in the rocks proved productive.  In this picture: Arthropod Order Decapoda (Crayfish) and Mayfly Species Hexagenia limbata (Hex). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
A crayfish chews on a Hexagenia limbata nymph shortly after a small Hex emergence. I didn't catch any fish, but playing around with my flashlight and camera in the rocks proved productive.

In this picture: Arthropod Order Decapoda (Crayfish) and Mayfly Species Hexagenia limbata (Hex).
Date TakenJun 14, 2006
Date AddedJun 30, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Several Baetidae nymphs line up on a rock.  In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives). From Mongaup Creek in New York.
Several Baetidae nymphs line up on a rock.

In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives).
Date TakenApr 19, 2006
Date AddedApr 22, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Underwater Photo Page:1234...13

Recent Discussions of Arthropoda

Arctopsyche Grandis 6 Replies »
Posted by Epeorus on Jul 2, 2014 in the genus Arctopsyche
Last reply on Jul 6, 2014 by Entoman
A while ago there was some discussion of this bug in Colorado. I first came across this beast in early July 2011 on the Eagle River, just downstream of Edwards, Co. Met him again this week on the Eagle. It's quite the blast - big bugs and big trout. Especially the ones rising with abandon in the fast water in the middle of the day.

Funny thing is we don't seem to see these guys most years. The commonality between 2011 and this year is an extended runoff leading to cold and high - though clear water in early July. I wonder if they normally hatch during the peak of the runoff when no one is on the water.

I remember people commenting about these caddis allegedly being in parts of Colorado. The hatches the last two days on the Eagle and what I saw in 2011 would add some level of credence to that belief.

A size 10 (on a Partridge L3A) sponge body caddis with a dark gray body, and a size 10 Lafontaine sparkle emerger with a gray body and a clear shroud were the ticket.
ReplySo is Ep Infrequens now known as Ep Dorothea? 20 Replies »
Posted by Wbranch on Feb 17, 2008 in the species Ephemerella dorothea infrequens
Last reply on Jul 1, 2014 by Crepuscular
These mayflies look more like the Sulfurs I see on the Delaware system than the PMD's I see in Montana. The Montana mayfly has a distinct yellow leading edge to an overall light dun gray wing and the abdomen and thorax have a more light greenish/yellow cloration so how is it that Infrequens is now known as Ep Dorothea Dorothea?
ReplyPredicting a hatch? 2 Replies »
Posted by U2ill on Apr 2, 2008 in the order Ephemeroptera
Last reply on Jun 24, 2014 by TNEAL
All,

Is it possible to predict a hatch (whether mayfly, caddis, stonefly, etc) based off of water, air, and weather data? So if I know streamflow, water temp, air temp, wind, cloudiness, etc...and I know what insects are on a stream...is that enough data to make a prediction like "There would be a good likelihood of a caddis hatch this afternoon"?
ReplyMoved from genus level to N. albida
Posted by Entoman on Jun 15, 2014 in the species Nectopsyche albida
It is my understanding that wing maculation is quite distinctive and consistent in this genus thus allowing species identification using this character. This specimen has been at the genus level for many years and somehow slipped through the cracks.;)
ReplyTiny Black Caddis hatch, late fall - Nov 26 to be exact_ Spring Creek Southern MO 20 Replies »
Posted by Dai_sca on Dec 29, 2010 in the family Hydroptilidae
Last reply on Jun 11, 2014 by Motrout
I had not fished Bennett Spring for many years and ended up there on Nov 26. I was not very prepared for the stream's entemology, spoke to someone at the flyshop and went with fishing a midge or two and this was very successful. But it was quite obvious that the trout were feeding on the surface or just under and it wasn't a midge. As the day progressed and late afternoon brought sunshine, a hatch of Tiny Caddis(Black) appeared. I had a size 18 but it wasn't dark enough or small enough. A gent who fished the stream regularly gave me a #24 black Elk Hair(or other hair) caddis. The fish took this fly as a dry off the surface. I am hard pressed to ID this fly aside from Protoptila. This, however, is not a marginally temp spring, the water is consistent flow a cold. The description of the Protoptila indicates that this insect is more a warm water insect. The hatch was occurring right at the spring itself. Any ideas?

Again, this was a size 24 fly, and maybe,just maybe, a 26 or 28 might have been the appropriate size for the insect as there were obvious refusals at the surface.

David (dai_sca@yahoo.com
Reply
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