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Animal Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)

Pictures Below
Arthropods include just about everything trout eat except for minnows, worms, and leeches.

Pictures of 1003 Arthropod Specimens:

Specimen Page:1234...101
Neophylax (Autumn Mottled Sedges) Caddisfly AdultNeophylax (Autumn Mottled Sedges) Caddisfly Adult View 20 PicturesThis large caddisfly looks really neat close-up.
Collected September 19, 2006 from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on October 4, 2006
Brachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis) Caddisfly AdultBrachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis) Caddisfly Adult View 13 PicturesI captured this specimen in the same color as this photograph, during its egg-laying flight. The emergers are much lighter.
Collected May 13, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Specimen Page:1234...101

78 Streamside Pictures of Arthropods:

Streamside Photo Page:1234...9
Caddis on Catskill cobble.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the Beaverkill River in New York.
Caddis on Catskill cobble.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 2, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
These caddisflies were thick over the water in the evening on a cold, clear northwoods lake.  They were in many places on the lake, all closer to the shady shore, which also was the shore most sheltered from the wind.  I'm not sure which of those features attracted them.  In this picture: Caddisfly Genus Nectopsyche (White Millers). From Lake Owen in Wisconsin.
These caddisflies were thick over the water in the evening on a cold, clear northwoods lake. They were in many places on the lake, all closer to the shady shore, which also was the shore most sheltered from the wind. I'm not sure which of those features attracted them.

In this picture: Caddisfly Genus Nectopsyche (White Millers).
LocationLake Owen
Date TakenJun 10, 2006
Date AddedJun 30, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This Ephemerella invaria sulphur dun got stuck in its shuck trying to emerge.  This isn't exactly a "natural" pose for a photograph, but it kind of shows what an emerger pattern could look like.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun). From the Neversink River in New York.
This Ephemerella invaria sulphur dun got stuck in its shuck (
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Shuck: The shed exoskeleton left over when an insect molts into its next stage or instar. Most often it describes the last nymphal or pupal skin exited during emergence into a winged adult.
)
trying to emerge. This isn't exactly a "natural" pose for a photograph, but it kind of shows what an emerger pattern could look like.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun).
Date TakenMay 20, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Streamside Photo Page:1234...9

122 Underwater Pictures of Arthropods:

Underwater Photo Page:1234...13
Hundreds of cased caddisfly larvae live on this log in a small brook trout stream.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin.
Hundreds of cased caddisfly larvae live on this log in a small brook trout stream.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Several Baetidae nymphs line up on a rock.  In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives). From Mongaup Creek in New York.
Several Baetidae nymphs line up on a rock.

In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives).
Date TakenApr 19, 2006
Date AddedApr 22, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Shown Full Size
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A Brachycentrus "Apple Caddis" pupa scoots around in the surface film.  Apparently it had some difficulty emerging, so I was able to slip my camera underneath it and take a picture from below.  In this picture: Caddisfly Species Brachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis). From the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
A Brachycentrus "Apple Caddis" pupa scoots around in the surface film. Apparently it had some difficulty emerging, so I was able to slip my camera underneath it and take a picture from below.

In this picture: Caddisfly Species Brachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis).
Date TakenApr 19, 2006
Date AddedApr 22, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Underwater Photo Page:1234...13

Recent Discussions of Arthropoda

Life cycles and hatches 3 Replies »
Posted by Leahdanger on Mar 7, 2014 in the family Chironomidae
Last reply on Mar 9, 2014 by Entoman
Hi,

I am trying to identify the life cycle of a few aquatic insects in eastern British Columbia. Specifically, I want to know if the species I collected in the fall (Aug-Oct) are a different hatch from the species I collected in the spring (April-May). Does anybody know when the following species lay eggs, die, and hatch: amphipods (Hyalella aztecha), chironomids, leeches, mayflies (Leptophlebiidae paraleptophlebia, Baetida sp.), and caddis flies (Oxyethira sp., Hydropsychidae arctopsyche)? For my purposes, knowing the general life cycle of amphipods and chironomids would be great.

Thanks much for your help!
Leah
ReplyHelopicus subvarians (Stonefly) common in New York waters! 6 Replies »
Posted by Walleye on Jan 7, 2014 in the genus Helopicus
Last reply on Jan 9, 2014 by Entoman
I have observed the Helopicus subvarians (springtime stonefly) for over 30 years on many of New Yorks Rivers, such as Beaverkill/Willowwemoc, Ausable (both east and west branch), West Canada Creek, and several others. Most of this time I believed it to be Acroneura nigrita ( Black Willow Stonely) as described by Ernest Schwiebert (Nymphs). Very distinct about the coloring of this Staonely is the last (rearward) sternites are very yellow (Ausable almost orange) while the riest is mostly black top and bottom. The thorax is again very distinctly marked with yellow (orange) with black on top. It is a most beautiflul stonefly, and is see it in May and June. It is well represented by the Montana Nymph is Black with yellow.
ReplyThe Tully Trico season 12 Replies »
Posted by BioGriz on Jun 24, 2013 in the genus Tricorythodes
Last reply on Dec 17, 2013 by 12345
Preface: Any hatch where you are knee deep in trout rising and sipping bugs is awesome, regardeless if you are struggling to get a tight line. But on my home water the Tulpehocken Creek (Tully), which many of you from PA have fished before, Trico hatch brings problems...
1) Stressfull/unhealthy conditions for the trout. i.e. low water & high temps
2) A lot more fishing pressure from the "fair weather" community

I am a relative greenhorn compared to some of you who have decades of experience under your belt, and am just fishing for some general opinions here.

Had a great day at rebers using sze 22 trike spinner but i am noticing the tully temp is climbing. What kind of impact can we make on the stream? Is fishing in the morning and laying off the trout in the afternoon ok? or should the tully be left alone completely??

Thanks for your input!
ReplyPolycentropodidae or? 12 Replies »
Posted by LowBudget on Oct 1, 2013 in the family Polycentropodidae
Last reply on Oct 14, 2013 by LowBudget
The first image is of a live caddis. It was collected from Trout Creek which is in the Delaware River watershed in upstate NY. The background is 1/4 inch ruled graph paper which is under the Petrie dish holding the caddis with water.

(User-posted images are only viewable in the forum section.)


The second shows small silk nets found on rocks in the same stream during the same sampling.


(User-posted images are only viewable in the forum section.)



I've been working all of my ID books including "Freshwater Macroinvertebrates of Northeastern North America" by Peckarsky.

The upper lip does not seem to have the T shape of a Fingernet caddis. It does have the heavy mandible with a brush of Polycentropodidae.

But, I'm not completely satisfied.

Anyone have thoughts on this?

Ed
ReplyBig Green River, Wisconsin, late September 1 Reply »
Posted by Admiralb on Sep 28, 2013 in the species Baetis brunneicolor
Last reply on Sep 30, 2013 by Entoman
I hosted two visiting delegates to the T.U. National Convention in Madison, WI. on September 25, 2013, taking them to the Big Green River in Grant County near Fennimore. There was a high overcast in the morning, and these mayflies [which I merely called "BWO's" and imitated with #16 parachute dries - thin olive bodies, gray wing posts and dun parachute hackle] - were active. Both of my guests raised browns fishing a gray nymph behind a #16 parachute dry BWO. As long as my flies catch fish, I don't need to be a detailed entomologist. Nevertheless, I do sincerely appreciate the detailed scientific info, because it helps me focus my flytying and fly selection. Thank you.
Reply
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