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Animal Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)

Pictures Below

This is page 4 of underwater photos of Arthropoda. Visit the main Arthropoda page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Arthropoda.

122 Underwater Pictures of Arthropods:

Underwater Photo Page:1...345...13
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These are probably 3rd instar larvae of Dicosmoecus gilvipes. The 4th instar larvae will be the round case made of sand grains.  In this picture: Caddisfly Species Dicosmoecus gilvipes (October Caddis). From the Touchet River in Washington.
These are probably 3rd instar larvae of Dicosmoecus gilvipes. The 4th instar larvae will be the round case made of sand grains.

In this picture: Caddisfly Species Dicosmoecus gilvipes (October Caddis).
Date TakenJun 23, 2011
Date AddedJun 27, 2011
AuthorBnewell
Camerau770SW,S770SW
The white blotches on this rock are Leucotrichia caddisfly cases, and the wispy tubes are cases made by a type of midge.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun), Caddisfly Species Leucotrichia pictipes (Ring Horn Microcaddis), and True Fly Family Chironomidae (Midges). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
The white blotches on this rock are Leucotrichia caddisfly cases, and the wispy tubes are cases made by a type of midge.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun), Caddisfly Species Leucotrichia pictipes (Ring Horn Microcaddis), and True Fly Family Chironomidae (Midges).
Date TakenMar 24, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives). From Spring Creek in Wisconsin.
LocationSpring Creek
Date TakenJun 22, 2006
Date AddedJul 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Some large Ephemerella mayfly nymphs cling to a log.  In the background, hundreds of Simuliidae black fly larvae swing in large clusters in the current.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson), True Fly Family Simuliidae (Black Flies), and Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Some large Ephemerella mayfly nymphs cling to a log. In the background, hundreds of Simuliidae black fly larvae swing in large clusters in the current.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson), True Fly Family Simuliidae (Black Flies), and Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun).
Date TakenMar 20, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Three big Ephemerella subvaria mayfly nymphs share a rock with some cased caddis larvae.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) and Saddle-case Maker Genus Glossosoma (Little Brown Short-horned Sedges). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenMar 20, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) nymph picture is one of my favorites.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
This Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) nymph picture is one of my favorites.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson).
Date TakenMar 24, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
There's a stonefly nymph in the bottom right corner of this picture, but what's really interesting is those white blotches. They're pretty common in my Wisconsin home river river, stuck flat onto the rocks--lots of rocks have a speckled look as a result. They are microcaddis cases, made by larvae of the caddisfly family Hydroptilidae. These are made by larvae of the subfamily Leucotrichiinae, most likely the genus Leucotrichia. They spin little flat oval cases of silk tight and immobile against the rocks.  In this picture: Caddisfly Species Leucotrichia pictipes (Ring Horn Microcaddis). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
There's a stonefly nymph in the bottom right corner of this picture, but what's really interesting is those white blotches. They're pretty common in my Wisconsin home river river, stuck flat onto the rocks--lots of rocks have a speckled look as a result. They are microcaddis cases, made by larvae of the caddisfly family Hydroptilidae. These are made by larvae of the subfamily Leucotrichiinae, most likely the genus Leucotrichia. They spin little flat oval cases of silk tight and immobile against the rocks.

In this picture: Caddisfly Species Leucotrichia pictipes (Ring Horn Microcaddis).
Date TakenMar 20, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenMar 24, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Cased caddis larvae blanket this section of stream bottom.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin.
Cased caddis larvae blanket this section of stream bottom.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Several caddis larvae cling in the current amongst the debris collected on an underwater alder branch.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the South Fork of the White River in Wisconsin.
Several caddis larvae cling in the current amongst the debris collected on an underwater alder branch.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenFeb 26, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
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