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Troutnut's Fly Fishing for Trout: Blog is a photographic shrine to trout, fly fishing, beautiful rivers, the fascinating flies we imitate, and how to match the hatch for every common species in North America. It is run by "Troutnut" Jason Neuswanger with help from many others.

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Aquatic insects of Alaska

By Troutnut on November 20th, 2015, 5:52 am
I was recently asked about good reading on the topic of aquatic insects in Alaska. I did some recent searches on this topic for work, and here's what I've found (thanks to Luke Jacobus for pointing me to more than a few of these).

The most recent species-specific source on mayflies is:

Randolph RP, McCafferty WP (2005) The mayflies (Ephemeroptera) of Alaska, including a new species of Heptageniidae. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 107, 190–199.

A comprehensive source to family-level distribution and abundance is:

Oswood MW (1989) Community structure of benthic invertebrates in interior Alaskan (USA) streams and rivers. (ed) High Latitude Limnology. Springer, pp 97–110

And here's a mixed bag of other papers including some interesting biology related to Alaska's cold climate:

Rinella DJ, Bogan DL, Shaftel RS, Merrigan D (2012) New aquatic insect (Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, and Plecoptera) records for Alaska, U.S.A.: range extensions and a comment on under-sampled habitats. Pan-Pacific Entomologist 88, 407–412.

Walters KR, Sformo T, Barnes BM, Duman JG (2009) Freeze tolerance in an arctic Alaska stonefly. J Exp Biol 212, 305–312.

Irons III JG, Miller LK, Oswood MW (1993) Ecological adaptations of aquatic macroinvertebrates to overwintering in interior Alaska (USA) subarctic streams. Canadian Journal of Zoology 71, 98–108.

Irons III JG (1988) Life history (Life history: The detailed life cycle of an organism, including the stages it passes through and characteristic behavior relating to growth and reproduction.) patterns and trophic ecology of Trichoptera in two Alaskan (USA) subarctic streams. Canadian journal of zoology 66, 1258–1265.

Cowan CA, Oswood MW, Buttimore CA, Flanagan PW (1983) Processing and macroinvertebrate colonization of detritus (Detritus: Small, loose pieces of decaying organic matter underwater.) in an Alaskan subarctic stream. Ecography 6, 340–348.

As for fishable hatches, the hatch anybody's likely to have to match here in interior Alaska is Drunella doddsii. I've also encountered grayling feeding ravenously on a species of Cinygmula that I think might be Cinygmula ramaleyi, but that's yet to be confirmed by entomologists and would represent a new record in this state if it's the case. Ephemerella aurivilii is another of the common mayflies around here, along with various unidentified (at least by me) members of Baetidae, Siphlonuridae, and Epeorus. But I haven't personally seen any of those in fishable numbers.

2015 Caribou Hunt

By Troutnut on September 19th, 2015, 3:28 pm
A week ago I returned from a hike-in, float-out, solo caribou hunt in the Arctic. I've posted the whole story in sections, but here are a few previews of the spectacular scenery.

Updates from September 4, 2015

Closeup insects by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #186 in Alaska

Male Cinygmula ramaleyi (Small Western Gordon Quill) Mayfly SpinnerMale Cinygmula ramaleyi (Small Western Gordon Quill) Mayfly Spinner View 4 PicturesThis one was preserved in ethanol and partially dissected, so it doesn't have its natural wild coloration, and it's missing some appendages. I'm posting it for identification purposes.
Collected September 4, 2015 from Mystery Creek #186 in Alaska
Added to by Troutnut on October 27, 2015

Caught my first cutthroat trout!

By Troutnut on August 17th, 2015
I was in Portland this week for the American Fisheries Society national meeting, and had time early Monday morning before the sessions started to meet up with a fishing buddy from college (thanks, Willy!) and try for some trout. That area is in the midst of a serious drought, so fish were hard to come by, but we each managed to draw a bit of interest in our flies, and I finally landed one fish.

It was only about 8-9" long, but it was my first cutthroat ever! I've been running a website called "Troutnut" for far too long to have never caught one of North America's major species. Problem solved now. Next up: golden trout? One can hope!

Photos by Troutnut from the Wilson River in Oregon

Just had to share this grayling photo right away.

By Troutnut on July 30th, 2015
I've been lucky enough this summer to see a tremendous amount of good scenery and good fishing during my work on three Alaskan streams and breaks in between. I have a backlog of good photos to share from all these adventures, once I eventually have time this winter. But this one I just couldn't wait to post.

Photos by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #186 in Alaska

Big Arctic grayling eating a Drunella doddsii mayfly dun. From Mystery Creek # 186 in Alaska.
Big Arctic grayling eating a Drunella doddsii mayfly dun.
Date TakenJul 30, 2015
Date AddedAug 3, 2015

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