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What is Troutnut.com?
Fly anglers live for the "hatches" when trout erupt in a feeding frenzy over the mass emergence aquatic insects from the river's surface. In these moments, trout can become so focused on one specific type of prey that they will pursue only a skillful imitation. Anglers who study aquatic insects to meet this challenge find that they're as captivating as the fish themselves. Every species has its own story, its own personality. We cross paths with these characters at the climax of a perennial drama of life and death, and--as with any great drama or sport--every play means so much more when we know the players inside and out. It's not just about catching fish. It's about knowing the stream and loving everything in it.

Troutnut.com's aquatic insect encyclopedia is a guide to these players and their stories. Read about the behavior of each species and view thousands of closeup photos, or join the fly fishing forum to meet other devotees of the world's healthiest addiction. You can learn the basics of mayflies, caddisflies, or stoneflies. Or dive into the details of storied species like the Hendrickson hatch and the Hex hatch.

Latest updates

The blog posts below describe every update ever added to Troutnut.com by myself (Troutnut) and other contributors, along with occasional other thoughts and stories from my adventures in fishing, hunting, research, and travel in Alaska and beyond.

Another obscure little Cutthroat stream

By Troutnut on July 23rd, 2017
Following Saturday's success chasing my first Westslope Cutthroat, my goal for Sunday was to find some closer to home. Once again ignoring the regional fishing guidebooks and chasing after half a sentence from an old technical report and some promising squiggles on Google Maps, we found another nice stream tumbling down out of the mountains. Again, there were willing trout in every pool.

My Google Maps sleuthing was a bit off, though. I chose my location based on the presence of some longer, slower, larger pools than were visible in most of the creek. Those turned out to be nearly empty, save for a few fingerlings. The best fish were in the more frequent plunge pools formed by the stream's abundant boulders. Interesting lesson learned.

Photos by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #200 and Mystery Creek #199 in Washington

In search of Westslope Cutthroat Trout

By Troutnut on July 22nd, 2017
Since moving to Washington in April, I've had a few chances to escape the crowds of the Seattle area and explore east of the Cascades, but one of my longtime goals -- to finally catch my first unambiguous, bonafide, beautiful Westslope Cutthroat -- had eluded me due to high water from spring snowmelt or fishing streams dominated by other trout. This weekend I went fishing and camping with my wife Lena & dog Taiga to check out a couple possible trout fishing spots.

Saturday, we dove into a labyrinth of forest roads, creeping along precipitous cliffs and changing one severely flat tire before arriving at a tiny stream in a high-altitude meadow. Having no previous information on this stream besides an old scientific report documenting the existence of the species, I was delighted to find one of the best small-stream fly fishing experiences I've had. There were fat, colorful Westslope Cutthroat in every likely-looking pool, and a few were pushing 10-11 inches, giants for the size of the water.

Photos by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #199 and the Yakima River in Washington

Updates from July 20, 2017

Updates from July 17, 2017

Photos by Troutnut from the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington

On-stream insect photos by Troutnut from the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington

In this picture: Mayfly Genus Caenis (Angler's Curses). From the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington.
Date TakenJul 17, 2017
Date AddedJul 24, 2017
AuthorTroutnut
CameraNIKON 1 AW1
Spent Caenis mayfly spinners on the water  In this picture: Mayfly Genus Caenis (Angler's Curses). From the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington.
Spent (Spent: The wing position of many aquatic insects when they fall on the water after mating. The wings of both sides lay flat on the water. The word may be used to describe insects with their wings in that position, as well as the position itself.) Caenis mayfly spinners on the water

In this picture: Mayfly Genus Caenis (Angler's Curses).
Date TakenJul 17, 2017
Date AddedJul 24, 2017
AuthorTroutnut
CameraNIKON 1 AW1

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington

Updates from July 14, 2017

Photos by Troutnut from the American River in Washington

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the American River in Washington

Female Drunella grandis (Western Green Drake) Mayfly DunFemale Drunella grandis (Western Green Drake) Mayfly Dun View 6 PicturesI collected this specimen while away from all my good photography equipment except the camera and one of my macro lenses, so I made do. The lighting is from lamps in a hotel room, so it was hard to edit for really true colors, but I tried to get as close as possible. The body was 13 mm long, wing 19 mm long.
Collected July 14, 2017 from the American River in Washington
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on July 24, 2017
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