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Updates from September 8, 2019

Photos by Troutnut from Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin

Eighteenmile Creek From Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin.
Eighteenmile Creek
Date TakenSep 8, 2019
Date AddedSep 14, 2019
AuthorTroutnut
CameraNIKON 1 AW1

Updates from September 4, 2019

Photos by Troutnut from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin

My parents fishing the lower Namekagon for smallmouths with Wendy from the Hayward Fly Fishing Company. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
My parents fishing the lower Namekagon for smallmouths with Wendy from the Hayward Fly Fishing Company.
Date TakenSep 4, 2019
Date AddedSep 14, 2019
AuthorTroutnut
CameraNIKON 1 AW1
 From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenSep 4, 2019
Date AddedSep 14, 2019
AuthorTroutnut
CameraNIKON 1 AW1

New Instagram account

By Troutnut on August 5th, 2019, 2:29 pm
For those of you who use Instagram, I've started sharing some of my photos there. Eventually it'll just be a way to share news of new Troutnut.com updates and pictures, but in order to build up a bit of a portfolio I'll be highlighting older images for a while as well.

Both "Troutnut" and "TheTroutnut" were unavailable, so my account name is "DrTroutnut" as the next-easiest thing to remember.

Please subscribe here if you'd like to see my photos on your feed occasionally.

A couple hours on the Middle Fork Snoqualmie

By Troutnut on August 4th, 2019
I talked my wife into a quick trip to one of our home rivers on August 4th. It was the lowest I've ever fished it (around 235 CFS downstream at the gage, far less up by us), and that made for some easy wading. Some of the pools were practically still-water fishing. However, we hit a particularly good one at dusk where we caught dozens of fish without even having to move our feet. The big ones of the night were 7-8", but it's still fun.

Photos by Troutnut from the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington

 From the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington.
Date TakenAug 4, 2019
Date AddedAug 5, 2019
AuthorTroutnut
CameraNIKON 1 AW1
 From the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington.
Date TakenAug 4, 2019
Date AddedAug 5, 2019
AuthorTroutnut
CameraNIKON 1 AW1

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington

Male Paraleptophlebia sculleni Mayfly SpinnerMale Paraleptophlebia sculleni  Mayfly Spinner View 10 PicturesFor a species not yet reported in my state, I've been surprised to find these in two different locations lately. I was tempted to think they're the more common Paraleptophlebia debilis, but the characteristic big dorsal (Dorsal: Top.) bump on the claspers (
The claspers of this male Hexagenia atrocaudata mayfly spinner are highlighted in green.
The claspers of this male Hexagenia atrocaudata mayfly spinner are highlighted in green.
Clasper: The claspers, also known as forceps, are a pair of appendages beneath the tip of the abdomen of male mayfly adults, which are used to grab onto the female while mating.
)
just isn't present.
Collected August 4, 2019 from the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River in Washington
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on August 5, 2019

Beauty and the bugs in a little meadow stream in central Washington

By Troutnut on July 28th, 2019
On Sunday July 28th, I drove 2-3 hours each way (traffic got crazy) to spend about 3 hours fishing and sampling bugs in a favorite small stream on the east side of the Cascades, where a meadow in the middle of a hot burn from a few years ago has produced surprisingly large (meaning up to 10") and spectacularly colorful Westslope Cutthroat Trout. It could almost be called a spring creek, at least in the meadow reaches, although the same clear, stable, spring-fed water tumbles through a rocky forest for most of its length.



It is by far the smallest stream I routinely fish, and sometimes it's so narrow the grass overlaps the water from both sides and leaves nowhere to cast. With the combination of close quarters, tight spaces, clear water, and bright sun, it was a real challenge to sneak up on fish and present a fly without spooking them.

Every once in a while it opens up to a "large pool" like this one, which held the biggest fish of the day (about 8.5").



The larger fish I've caught previously were either hiding under the cut banks for the day or living in bigger water downstream. It's possible I've seen them up this high in the past because I fished it about a month earlier and they were up there spawning. I explored the forested reach below for just a little while and caught one still in spawning colors:




I was as interested in bug collecting on this trip as in the fish themselves, because I figured the altitude (around 5,000 feet) and spring-fed nature of the system might offer something new to find. It didn't disappoint. By far the most abundant large nymphs in my kicknet sample were Drunella coloradensis, and I collected my first adults of this species as well.



Among the dozens of nymphs of that species, I found a single specimen of a really unique-looking mayfly nymph that got me excited, the ultra-spiky Drunella spinifera:



I also collected my first adult of the extremely common caddisfly genus Rhyacophila:



And sweeping around the grass overhanging the stream turned up a few specimens of Dolichopodidae, or Longlegged Flies.

Photos by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #199 and Mystery Creek #250 in Washington

Closeup insects by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #199 and Mystery Creek #250 in Washington

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