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Landscape & scenery photos from the Namekagon River

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I captured this sunset over one of my favorite holes. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
I captured this sunset over one of my favorite holes.
Date TakenJun 20, 2005
Date AddedFeb 8, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This is one of my favorite pictures of the Namekagon. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
This is one of my favorite pictures of the Namekagon.
Date TakenMay 30, 2005
Date AddedFeb 8, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
I don't know if I skunked this day or not. I didn't catch any trout, but, um... does this count? (He grabbed onto my Pink Squirrel nymph as it drifted along the bottom and held on for dear life with his pincers.) From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
I don't know if I skunked this day or not. I didn't catch any trout, but, um... does this count? (He grabbed onto my Pink Squirrel nymph as it drifted along the bottom and held on for dear life with his pincers.)
Date TakenApr 16, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
A large spring's short outlet enters the river here and keeps it open during even the deepest cold spells. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
A large spring's short outlet enters the river here and keeps it open during even the deepest cold spells.
Date TakenFeb 3, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
I'm in this picture casing into the riffle above one of my favorite pools.  The fishing was fine, but the catching wasn't so hot.  I got one strike on my carefully tied nymphs and two on my cheap foam strike indicator. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
I'm in this picture casing into the riffle above one of my favorite pools. The fishing was fine, but the catching wasn't so hot. I got one strike on my carefully tied nymphs and two on my cheap foam strike indicator.
Date TakenApr 18, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
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Underwater photos from the Namekagon River

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In this picture: Arthropod Order Decapoda (Crayfish). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenMar 24, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
The white blotches on this rock are Leucotrichia caddisfly cases, and the wispy tubes are cases made by a type of midge.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun), Caddisfly Species Leucotrichia pictipes (Ring Horn Microcaddis), and True Fly Family Chironomidae (Midges). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
The white blotches on this rock are Leucotrichia caddisfly cases, and the wispy tubes are cases made by a type of midge.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun), Caddisfly Species Leucotrichia pictipes (Ring Horn Microcaddis), and True Fly Family Chironomidae (Midges).
Date TakenMar 24, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Some large Ephemerella mayfly nymphs cling to a log.  In the background, hundreds of Simuliidae black fly larvae swing in large clusters in the current.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson), Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun), and True Fly Family Simuliidae (Black Flies). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Some large Ephemerella mayfly nymphs cling to a log. In the background, hundreds of Simuliidae black fly larvae swing in large clusters in the current.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson), Mayfly Species Ephemerella invaria (Sulphur Dun), and True Fly Family Simuliidae (Black Flies).
Date TakenMar 20, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Three big Ephemerella subvaria mayfly nymphs share a rock with some cased caddis larvae.  In this picture: Saddle-case Maker Genus Glossosoma (Little Brown Short-horned Sedges) and Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenMar 20, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
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On-stream insect photos from the Namekagon River

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Several large stoneflies recently emerged and left their nymphal skins on this log in fast water.  Imitating the fluttering adults helped me hook a couple trout. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Several large stoneflies recently emerged and left their nymphal skins on this log in fast water. Imitating the fluttering adults helped me hook a couple trout.
Date TakenJun 12, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Some Hexagenia limbata duns and several smaller mayflies litter the surface of this river during a Hex emergence. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Some Hexagenia limbata duns and several smaller mayflies litter the surface of this river during a Hex emergence.
Date TakenJun 18, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
An early season stonefly nymph looking to hatch crawls across a snow-covered midstream boulder. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
An early season stonefly nymph looking to hatch crawls across a snow-covered midstream boulder.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
When the freshly shed nymphal skins of large stoneflies cover a log like this, imitating the nymphs is a good bet for large trout. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
When the freshly shed nymphal skins of large stoneflies cover a log like this, imitating the nymphs is a good bet for large trout.
Date TakenJun 12, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
A huge swarm of Hexagenia limbata spinners gathers over the riffle. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
A huge swarm of Hexagenia limbata spinners gathers over the riffle.
Date TakenJun 18, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
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Videos from the Namekagon River

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Blizzard-like Hex Hatch
This video shows just how blizzard-like the Hexagenia limbata hatch can be. I only wish my digital camera had had respectable video capability back in 2005.

The Namekagon is not known as a Hex hatch river, for good reason: the hatch is extremely rare and localized, and there are often few if any trout where the Hexes are. During this trip I caught nothing and heard no risers, but it was still a memorable night out in the middle of nowhere.
Date ShotJun 18, 2005
Date AddedMar 31, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Dragonfly Nymph Scooting Around
Dragonfly nymphs propel themselves through the water with a miniature jet engine, taking water in below their mouths and shooting it out their back ends. You can see the ripples from the jet out this one's back in this video.
Date ShotJan 13, 2004
Date AddedMar 31, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Isonychia nymph swimming around
These nymphs may be the best swimmers of all North American mayflies.
Date ShotJan 19, 2004
Date AddedMar 31, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
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Closeup insects from the Namekagon River

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