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On-stream insect photos from the Namekagon River

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Giant Hexagenia limbata spinners leave ghostly trails around the glow of a full moon. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Giant Hexagenia limbata spinners leave ghostly trails around the glow of a full moon.
Date TakenJun 18, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Large stonefly nymphs sometimes crawl quite far from the water before emerging.  This empty case is from a nymph that hatched about 5 feet up in a tree 10 feet from the river. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Large stonefly nymphs sometimes crawl quite far from the water before emerging. This empty case is from a nymph that hatched about 5 feet up in a tree 10 feet from the river.
Date TakenJun 11, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
A dense cloud of extremely tiny flies hovers close over the river. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
A dense cloud of extremely tiny flies hovers close over the river.
Date TakenMay 29, 2005
Date AddedNov 30, 1999
AuthorTroutnut
Two Ephemera simulans (Brown Drake) spinners hang from tree leaves along the river.  It's worthwhile to look for these in afternoons during the Brown Drake hatch, because their presence may reveal the best place to fish in the evening. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Two Ephemera simulans (Brown Drake) spinners hang from tree leaves along the river. It's worthwhile to look for these in afternoons during the Brown Drake hatch, because their presence may reveal the best place to fish in the evening.
Date TakenJun 11, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Always keep an eye on your waders for sign of caddisflies, both live adults and fresh eggs.  Both are a sign that the adults are diving to lay their eggs on underwater objects (like your leg), and that means a diving caddis pattern (I like LaFontaine's) is probably the best fly to use. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Always keep an eye on your waders for sign of caddisflies, both live adults and fresh eggs. Both are a sign that the adults are diving to lay their eggs on underwater objects (like your leg), and that means a diving caddis pattern (I like LaFontaine's) is probably the best fly to use.
Date TakenJun 15, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
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This is the skin a brown drake dun shed when it molted into a spinner.  Many of these were on the surface one afternoon, having been blown in after the flies molted on overhanging alders.  They were our most noticeable sign of an intense brown drake hatch the previous night and a spinner fall to come. From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
This is the skin a brown drake dun shed when it molted into a spinner. Many of these were on the surface one afternoon, having been blown in after the flies molted on overhanging alders. They were our most noticeable sign of an intense brown drake hatch the previous night and a spinner fall to come.
Date TakenJun 16, 2006
Date AddedJul 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Page:12

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