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Updates from March 22, 2005

Photos by Troutnut from Willowemoc Creek, the Beaverkill River, and the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York

My friend Ian throws a fine cast in a section of river that's open year-round.  From the bridge, we spotted a very nice brown nymphing, but neither of us could get it to take. From Willowemoc Creek in New York.
My friend Ian throws a fine cast in a section of river that's open year-round. From the bridge, we spotted a very nice brown nymphing, but neither of us could get it to take.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This is Cairn's Pool on the Beaverkill, possibly the most famous pool in all of trout fishing. From the Beaverkill River in New York.
This is Cairn's Pool on the Beaverkill, possibly the most famous pool in all of trout fishing.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This nice brown trout was so well-camouflaged at the bottom of the stream that he required a zoom lens, polarizing filter, and digital contrast enhancement to photograph.  My friend Ian and I watched from the bridge as this big trout fed on nymphs for several minutes, and then we took turns trying to catch it.  The selective brown practically laughed us off the river. From Willowemoc Creek in New York.
This nice brown trout was so well-camouflaged at the bottom of the stream that he required a zoom lens, polarizing filter, and digital contrast enhancement to photograph. My friend Ian and I watched from the bridge as this big trout fed on nymphs for several minutes, and then we took turns trying to catch it. The selective brown practically laughed us off the river.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
 From Willowemoc Creek in New York.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
A late winter sunset radiates over a Catskill ridge.  This picture is taken near a popular landing on one of the main tailwaters. From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
A late winter sunset radiates over a Catskill ridge. This picture is taken near a popular landing on one of the main tailwaters.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
 From Willowemoc Creek in New York.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
I love how clear the water can be in the Catskills when it hasn't rained for a little while.  A polarizing filter (or sunglasses!) helps, too. From Willowemoc Creek in New York.
I love how clear the water can be in the Catskills when it hasn't rained for a little while. A polarizing filter (or sunglasses!) helps, too.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
 From Willowemoc Creek in New York.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
A small tributary tumbles toward a large Catskill river. From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
A small tributary tumbles toward a large Catskill river.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
 From Willowemoc Creek in New York.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
 From Willowemoc Creek in New York.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
 From the Beaverkill River, Cairns Pool in New York.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut

On-stream insect photos by Troutnut from the Namekagon River and the Beaverkill River in Wisconsin and New York

An early season stonefly nymph looking to hatch crawls across a snow-covered midstream boulder.  In this picture: Insect Order Plecoptera (Stoneflies). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
An early season stonefly nymph looking to hatch crawls across a snow-covered midstream boulder.

In this picture: Insect Order Plecoptera (Stoneflies).
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
I'm not sure what the caddisflies in this tight cluster are doing, but I'd guess it has something to do with mating.  They scooted all around the rock, with some flies leaving the cluster and new ones coming all the time.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the Beaverkill River in New York.
I'm not sure what the caddisflies in this tight cluster are doing, but I'd guess it has something to do with mating. They scooted all around the rock, with some flies leaving the cluster and new ones coming all the time.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedJan 24, 2006
AuthorTroutnut

Most recent comments on this post (latest on top)

TaxonJanuary 10th, 2013, 3:59 am
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1249
Hi Jason-

I'm not sure what the caddisflies in this tight cluster are doing, but I'd guess it has something to do with mating. They scooted all around the rock, with some flies leaving the cluster and new ones coming all the time.


Unless I'm mistaken, the scientific term for this is cluster****.

Sorry Lewis, but I simply couldn't resist Jason's cleverly baited hook. :-)
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
EntomanJanuary 9th, 2013, 9:42 pm
Site Editor
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Interesting behavior by those caddis. Don't think it's mating. Could they be obtaining something from that lichen or whatever the growth is?
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
WbranchJanuary 8th, 2013, 2:27 pm
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 1976
Jason,

"Some of them are from what I've heard called "Power-Line Pool," which I'd guess is the same thing."

Yes, that's it! I used to park my 1969 VW Campmobile either at the upper end or down near the flat water pool and stay there all weekend. I'll look at some of my scanned prints to see if I have any from the "olden days" of my youth.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
TroutnutJanuary 8th, 2013, 1:40 pm
Administrator
Fairbanks, AK

Posts: 2375
Some of them are from what I've heard called "Power-Line Pool," which I'd guess is the same thing.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
WbranchJanuary 8th, 2013, 1:02 pm
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 1976
Great pictures! The ones of the bridge are behind Harry Darbee's house. I've fished there many times. The fish always hang on the left side as there is deeper water there. Down stream by the old abutment used to be tons of stocked browns.

I couple of the other pictures look like they were taken at what we used to call "The Power Enclosure". About three miles upstream from the bridge pictures and just below the beginning of the No-Kill water. Am I right? I've caught some of the few rainbows I've ever caught on the Willow in that riffle.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.

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