Troutnut.com Fly Fishing for Trout Home
User Password
or register.
Scientific name search:

> > The Beaverkill River

The Beaverkill is perhaps the most famous fly fishing stream in America, largely because of its history, and it can still be a good one if you don't let its history spoil your expectations.

Almost every pool has a name and a story or three in the great works of fly fishing literature.

Landscape & scenery photos from the Beaverkill River

Page:1234...6
This 15" brown trout took a small emergent sparkle pupa on a large Catskill river. From the Beaverkill River in New York.
This 15" brown trout took a small emergent sparkle pupa on a large Catskill river.
Date TakenAug 24, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Here's an underwater post-release picture of a 15" brown trout I caught in a clear Catskill river. From the Beaverkill River in New York.
Here's an underwater post-release picture of a 15" brown trout I caught in a clear Catskill river.
Date TakenAug 24, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
 From the Beaverkill River in New York.
Date TakenOct 9, 2004
Date AddedJan 18, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This is Cairn's Pool on the Beaverkill, possibly the most famous pool in all of trout fishing. From the Beaverkill River in New York.
This is Cairn's Pool on the Beaverkill, possibly the most famous pool in all of trout fishing.
Date TakenMar 22, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
I'm breaking my rule about naming locations for this picture, since the context adds much to its meaning.  This great blue heron is standing on a slab of river-worn concrete silhouetted against the NY Quickway bridge over the Beaverkill River at Cairn's Pool.  Several human fishermen pursue trout from one shore while an avian fisherman pursues them from the other. From the Beaverkill River in New York.
I'm breaking my rule about naming locations for this picture, since the context adds much to its meaning. This great blue heron is standing on a slab of river-worn concrete silhouetted against the NY Quickway bridge over the Beaverkill River at Cairn's Pool. Several human fishermen pursue trout from one shore while an avian fisherman pursues them from the other.
Date TakenOct 9, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Page:1234...6

On-stream insect photos from the Beaverkill River

Page:12
Caddis on Catskill cobble.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the Beaverkill River in New York.
Caddis on Catskill cobble.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 2, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Here are the empty nymphal cases of Isonychia bicolor mayflies which hatched in early fall in the Catskills by crawling out onto a rock.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Isonychia bicolor (Mahogany Dun). From the Beaverkill River in New York.
Here are the empty nymphal cases of Isonychia bicolor mayflies which hatched in early fall in the Catskills by crawling out onto a rock.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Isonychia bicolor (Mahogany Dun).
Date TakenAug 24, 2004
Date AddedJan 17, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
In this picture: True Fly Family Chironomidae (Midges). From the Beaverkill River in New York.
Date TakenMay 7, 2005
Date AddedMar 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
I found this little Paraleptophlebia dun along a Catskill stream, but not enough of her brethren were emerging to get the early-season trout to rise.  In this picture: Mayfly Genus Paraleptophlebia (Blue Quills and Mahogany Duns). From the Beaverkill River in New York.
I found this little Paraleptophlebia dun along a Catskill stream, but not enough of her brethren were emerging to get the early-season trout to rise.

In this picture: Mayfly Genus Paraleptophlebia (Blue Quills and Mahogany Duns).
Date TakenMay 7, 2005
Date AddedMar 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
An ant struggles to escape the surface of a Catskill stream.  The black dot on the right is the ant's shadow on a rock on the bottom.  I can see how this would appeal to a trout.  Even I kind of want to eat the thing.  In this picture: Insect Family Formicidae (Ants). From the Beaverkill River, Horton Bridge Pool in New York.
An ant struggles to escape the surface of a Catskill stream. The black dot on the right is the ant's shadow on a rock on the bottom. I can see how this would appeal to a trout. Even I kind of want to eat the thing.

In this picture: Insect Family Formicidae (Ants).
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 2, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Page:12

Closeup insects from the Beaverkill River

Page:123
Male Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) Mayfly DunMale Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) Mayfly Dun View 9 PicturesI collected this male Hendrickson dun and a female in the pool on the Beaverkill where the popular Hendrickson pattern was first created. He is descended from mayfly royalty.
Collected April 19, 2006 from the Beaverkill River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 22, 2006
Male Epeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly DunMale Epeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly Dun View 4 PicturesThis is my favorite mayfly from 2004, and it appears on my popular Be the Trout: Eat Mayflies products. Check them out!

Its identification is really up in the air. It might be a late-season vitreus dun but it may very well be one of the more obscure species in that genus.
Collected September 2, 2004 from the Beaverkill River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Isonychia bicolor (Mahogany Dun) Mayfly NymphIsonychia bicolor (Mahogany Dun) Mayfly Nymph View 7 PicturesThis Isonychia bicolor nymph from the Catskills displays the prominent white stripe sometimes characteristic of its species. This is the first such specimen I've photographed, because members of the same species in the Upper Midwest have a more subdued stripe (and were once thought to be a different species, Isonychia sadleri). The striking coloration on this eastern nymph is more appealing.
Collected April 19, 2006 from the Beaverkill River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 21, 2006
Female Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) Mayfly DunFemale Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) Mayfly Dun View 9 PicturesI collected this female Hendrickson dun and a male in the pool on the Beaverkill where the popular Hendrickson pattern was first created. She is descended from mayfly royalty.
Collected April 19, 2006 from the Beaverkill River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 22, 2006
Page:123

Start a Discussion of the Beaverkill River:

You must log in at the top of the page to post. If you haven't registered yet, it's this easy:

Username:          Email:

Password:    Confirm Password:

I am at least 13 years old and agree to the rules.
Top 10 Fly Hatches
Top Gift Shop Designs
Top Insect Specimens
Miscellaneous Sites