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Updates from April 16, 2005

Photos by Troutnut from Willowemoc Creek, the Beaverkill River, and the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York

Distant anglers dunk worms outside a small Catskill town at the meeting of two great trout streams. From the Beaverkill River, Junction Pool in New York.
Distant anglers dunk worms outside a small Catskill town at the meeting of two great trout streams.
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
The trout streams of the Catskills are often beautiful and clear, but unlike spring creeks they are prone to dramatic flooding at times.  This picture shows flood-swept vegetation fifty yards from and several feet above the normal channel. From Willowemoc Creek, Powerline Pool in New York.
The trout streams of the Catskills are often beautiful and clear, but unlike spring creeks they are prone to dramatic flooding at times. This picture shows flood-swept vegetation fifty yards from and several feet above the normal channel.
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
 From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut

On-stream insect photos by Troutnut from the Beaverkill River, the West Branch of the Delaware River, and Miscellaneous Wisconsin in New York and Wisconsin

Caddis on Catskill cobble.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the Beaverkill River in New York.
Caddis on Catskill cobble.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 2, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Many beetles of this species were jumping around the rocks like popcorn on a mid-April afternoon.  I'm sure they end up in the water for the trout at times.  In this picture: Insect Order Coleoptera (Beetles). From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
Many beetles of this species were jumping around the rocks like popcorn on a mid-April afternoon. I'm sure they end up in the water for the trout at times.

In this picture: Insect Order Coleoptera (Beetles).
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 2, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
An ant struggles to escape the surface of a Catskill stream.  The black dot on the right is the ant's shadow on a rock on the bottom.  I can see how this would appeal to a trout.  Even I kind of want to eat the thing.  In this picture: Insect Family Formicidae (Ants). From the Beaverkill River, Horton Bridge Pool in New York.
An ant struggles to escape the surface of a Catskill stream. The black dot on the right is the ant's shadow on a rock on the bottom. I can see how this would appeal to a trout. Even I kind of want to eat the thing.

In this picture: Insect Family Formicidae (Ants).
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 2, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This spider lives in the rocks streambed of a Catskill trout stream.  In this picture: Arthropod Order Araneae (Spiders). From unknown in Wisconsin.
This spider lives in the rocks streambed of a Catskill trout stream.

In this picture: Arthropod Order Araneae (Spiders).
Date TakenApr 16, 2005
Date AddedFeb 2, 2006
AuthorTroutnut

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