Troutnut.com Fly Fishing for Trout Home
User Password
or register.
Scientific name search:

Animal Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)

Pictures Below

This is page 3 of specimens of Arthropoda. Visit the main Arthropoda page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Arthropoda.
  • 122 underwater pictures of Arthropoda.
  • 4 streamside pictures of Arthropoda.

Pictures of 1058 Arthropod Specimens:

Specimen Page:1234...107
Male Nixe inconspicua Mayfly DunMale Nixe inconspicua  Mayfly Dun View 13 PicturesThis pretty little dun was part of a sparse midsummer evening hatch on a large Catskill river.

I could not identify it by following a species key step by step, but I tentatively keyed it to the genus Nixe, and based on distribution maps and physical descriptions the most likely species is Nixe inconspicua.
Collected July 13, 2005 from the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 14, 2006
Female Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly SpinnerFemale Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Spinner View 12 PicturesThis species is probably in Centroptilum, Cloeon, or Procloeon. I captured this spinner on the same night as a dun which is probably of the same species.
Collected August 9, 2006 from the West Branch of Owego Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on August 11, 2006
Argia Damselfly NymphArgia  Damselfly Nymph View 3 PicturesMy friend Willy captured this early instar (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.) damselfly nymph and brought it to me for identification. It is more robust and stocky at this early stage than the spindly appearance of the later instars (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.), and its appearance is less familiar.
Collected August 28, 2005 from Fall Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 14, 2006
Male Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly DunMale Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly Dun View 12 PicturesI hoped this dun would molt into a spinner for a positive ID, but it didn't. My best guess is Epeorus dulciana, but that's only because that's the smallest western Epeorus species, and this specimen is smaller than any of the others, with a body length of 5.3 mm (although it would be longer as a spinner) and a wing length of 8.5 mm.

It was collected at the same time as a similar-sized female dun.
Collected July 5, 2017 from the South Fork Sauk River in Washington
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on July 6, 2017
Male Rhithrogena virilis Mayfly SpinnerMale Rhithrogena virilis  Mayfly Spinner View 12 PicturesI'm fairly sure this is a specimen of Rhithrogena virilis based on closeup examination of the reproductive anatomy under the microscope (not shown in photos). The other other species of Rhithrogena this large is Rhithrogena flavianula, but the key in Needham's Biology of Mayflies mentions annulation in the abdomen (visible in some images on bugguide.net) more distinct than that on this specimen.

The body and front wing were both about 15.5 mm long, while the cerci (Cercus: The left and right "tails" of an insect are known as the cerci or caudal cerci. The middle tail of a three-tailed insect is not.) were 40 mm long.
Collected July 5, 2017 from the South Fork Sauk River in Washington
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on July 6, 2017
Hydropsyche aenigma (Spotted Sedge) Caddisfly AdultHydropsyche aenigma (Spotted Sedge) Caddisfly Adult View 18 PicturesThese big caddisflies were tempting trout as they wriggled out of their shucks (
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Shuck: The shed exoskeleton left over when an insect molts into its next stage or instar. Most often it describes the last nymphal or pupal skin exited during emergence into a winged adult.
)
, while others skated across the water at a medium pace, probably egg-laying.
Collected May 15, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Specimen Page:1234...107
Top 10 Fly Hatches
Top Gift Shop Designs
Top Insect Specimens
Miscellaneous Sites