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Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies)

Pictures Below

This is page 4 of underwater photos of Trichoptera. Visit the main Trichoptera page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Trichoptera.
  • Studio pictures of 96 Trichoptera specimens.

55 Underwater Pictures of Caddisflies:

Underwater Photo Page:1...345...7
Three big Ephemerella subvaria mayfly nymphs share a rock with some cased caddis larvae.  In this picture: Saddle-case Maker Genus Glossosoma (Little Brown Short-horned Sedges) and Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenMar 20, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the Bois Brule River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenApr 13, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Several well-camouflaged Ephemerella mayfly nymphs cling to this log, and a few cased caddisfly larvae cling to the plant in front of it.  In this picture: Mayfly Genus Ephemerella (Hendricksons, Sulphurs, PMDs) and Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the Bois Brule River in Wisconsin.
Several well-camouflaged Ephemerella mayfly nymphs cling to this log, and a few cased caddisfly larvae cling to the plant in front of it.

In this picture: Mayfly Genus Ephemerella (Hendricksons, Sulphurs, PMDs) and Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 13, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the Bois Brule River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenApr 13, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin.
Date TakenApr 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
There's a stonefly nymph in the bottom right corner of this picture, but what's really interesting is those white blotches. They're pretty common in my Wisconsin home river river, stuck flat onto the rocks--lots of rocks have a speckled look as a result. They are microcaddis cases, made by larvae of the caddisfly family Hydroptilidae. These are made by larvae of the subfamily Leucotrichiinae, most likely the genus Leucotrichia. They spin little flat oval cases of silk tight and immobile against the rocks.  In this picture: Caddisfly Species Leucotrichia pictipes (Ring Horn Microcaddis). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
There's a stonefly nymph in the bottom right corner of this picture, but what's really interesting is those white blotches. They're pretty common in my Wisconsin home river river, stuck flat onto the rocks--lots of rocks have a speckled look as a result. They are microcaddis cases, made by larvae of the caddisfly family Hydroptilidae. These are made by larvae of the subfamily Leucotrichiinae, most likely the genus Leucotrichia. They spin little flat oval cases of silk tight and immobile against the rocks.

In this picture: Caddisfly Species Leucotrichia pictipes (Ring Horn Microcaddis).
Date TakenMar 20, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Several Baetid mayfly nymphs cling to this rock.  There are also some clumps of small stones which hold strong caddisfly larvae.  In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) and Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin.
Several Baetid mayfly nymphs cling to this rock. There are also some clumps of small stones which hold strong caddisfly larvae.

In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) and Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenMar 19, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Underwater Photo Page:1...345...7
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