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Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives)

Pictures Below

This is page 2 of specimens of Baetidae. Visit the main Baetidae page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Baetidae.
  • 10 underwater pictures of Baetidae.
  • 1 streamside picture of Baetidae.

Pictures of 84 Mayfly Specimens in the Family Baetidae:

Specimen Page:1234...10
Female Baetis (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly DunFemale Baetis (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Dun View 5 PicturesI found this female in the same area as a male with similar markings, probably of the same species.
Collected September 19, 2006 from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on October 4, 2006
Male Baetis tricaudatus (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly DunMale Baetis tricaudatus (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun View 8 PicturesThis male was associated with a female of the same species.
Collected April 3, 2007 from Owasco Inlet in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 3, 2007
Female Baetis tricaudatus (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly DunFemale Baetis tricaudatus (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun View 7 PicturesThis female was associated with a male of the same species.
Collected April 3, 2007 from Owasco Inlet in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 3, 2007
Female Baetis (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly DunFemale Baetis (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Dun View 7 PicturesThis little early-season dun molted into this spinner after I photographed her.
Collected April 19, 2006 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 21, 2006
Male Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly NymphMale Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Nymph View 10 PicturesThis male nymph is probably in its final instar (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.). The wing pads (
The wing pads on this final instar Baetidae mayfly nymph are extremely dark.
The wing pads on this final instar Baetidae mayfly nymph are extremely dark.
Wing pad: A protrusion from the thorax of an insect nymph which holds the developing wings. Black wing pads usually indicate that the nymph is nearly ready to emerge into an adult.
)
are extremely black and the large turbinate (
This male Baetidae dun has slightly turbinate eyes.
This male Baetidae dun has slightly turbinate eyes.
Turbinate: Shaped like a top or elevated on a stalk; usually refers to the eyes of some adult male Baetidae mayflies which are wider near the tip than at the base.
)
eyes are very apparent inside the nymph's head.
Collected June 9, 2005 from the Bois Brule River in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 26, 2006
Female Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly DunFemale Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Dun View 5 PicturesI captured this dun on the same night as a spinner which is probably of the same species.
Collected August 9, 2006 from the West Branch of Owego Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on August 11, 2006
Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly NymphBaetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Nymph View 5 PicturesThis nymph has only two real tails. The third is present, but too short to see in these pictures. It has particularly small gills and indistinct gill veinlets (Veinlet: Short insect wing veins connecting the major longitudinal veins to the wing margin.).
Collected February 7, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Specimen Page:1234...10
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