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Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives)



Pictures Below

This is page 4 of specimens of Baetidae. Visit the main Baetidae page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Baetidae.
  • 10 underwater pictures of Baetidae.

Pictures of 103 Mayfly Specimens in the Family Baetidae:

Specimen Page:1...345...11
Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly NymphBaetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Nymph View 3 PicturesThis specimen has indistinct gill veinlets (Veinlet: Short insect wing veins connecting the major longitudinal veins to the wing margin.), a rounded seventh gill, and no bands on the tails.
Collected February 7, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Callibaetis ferrugineus (Speckled Spinner) Mayfly AdultCallibaetis ferrugineus (Speckled Spinner) Mayfly Adult View 3 PicturesThese adults are probably C. ferrugineus.
Collected August 13, 2009 from the Flathead River-lower in Montana
Added to Troutnut.com by Bnewell on June 27, 2011
Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly NymphBaetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Nymph View 2 PicturesHere's a rather different tiny Baetid nymph. The tails are all unbanded, and the tergites (
One tergite of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
One tergite of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
Tergite: The top (dorsal) part of a single segment on an insect's abdomen when it consists of a single chitinous plate (sclerite), or an individual sclerite if the segment has more than one.
)
all have a dark-colored anterior (Anterior: Toward the front of an organism's body. The phrase "anterior to" means "in front of.") 2/3 and light-colored posterior (Posterior: Toward the back of an organism's body. The phrase "posterior to" means "in back of.") 1/3. The gill veinlets (Veinlet: Short insect wing veins connecting the major longitudinal veins to the wing margin.) are indistinct. It's probably a very early instar (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.) of some Baetis species.
Collected January 31, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Acerpenna pygmaea (Tiny Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly NymphAcerpenna pygmaea (Tiny Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Nymph View 3 PicturesThis is a very rare mayfly in western Montana. The shape of the last gill is a key to its identification. I have collected this species in only one location.
Collected May 5, 2007 from the Upper Stillwater River in Montana
Added to Troutnut.com by Bnewell on June 26, 2011
Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly NymphBaetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Nymph View 3 PicturesThis little Baetid looks a little stiff because it died shortly before being photographed.
Collected February 5, 2004 from the Bois Brule River in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly NymphBaetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Nymph View 2 PicturesThis nymph has gills with indistinct veinlets (Veinlet: Short insect wing veins connecting the major longitudinal veins to the wing margin.), segments 5, 9, and 10 pale, a rounded 7th gill, and a very short middle tail.
Collected February 7, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Specimen Page:1...345...11
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