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Tiny Winter Blacks

Like most common names, "Tiny Winter Black" can refer to more than one taxon. They're previewed below, along with 5 specimens. For more detail click through to the scientific names.

Stonefly Family Capniidae

These are sometimes called Tiny Winter Blacks.
These are the first stoneflies of the year to appear in most parts of the country, and often the first aquatic insects noticed by the angler. Their dark brown or black bodies are easy to spot against the snowbanks where they crawl around.

Capnia in the West and Allocapnia in the East are probably the most common genera of this prolific family.
Capniidae (Snowflies) Stonefly NymphCapniidae (Snowflies) Stonefly Nymph View 4 Pictures
Collected March 13, 2005 from in
Added to Troutnut.com by on April 5, 2006
Capniidae (Snowflies) Stonefly AdultCapniidae (Snowflies) Stonefly Adult View 6 Pictures
Collected March 29, 2005 from in
Added to Troutnut.com by on April 7, 2006

Stonefly Family Leuctridae

These are sometimes called Tiny Winter Blacks.
Leuctra is the only genus of any known importance to trout anglers. Their wings are rolled to a needle-like point; hence the common name, needle flies.
Megaleuctra stigmata (Little Black Needlefly) Stonefly AdultMegaleuctra stigmata (Little Black Needlefly) Stonefly Adult View 3 PicturesThis is one of rarest stoneflies in western Montana. It is a bit unusual that it is fairly abundant in a handful of streams that empty into the east side of Flathead Lake. A very beautiful bug.
Collected May 18, 2005 from in
Added to Troutnut.com by on June 28, 2011

Stonefly Family Nemouridae

These are sometimes called Tiny Winter Blacks.
Prostoia (Tiny Winter Blacks) Stonefly NymphProstoia (Tiny Winter Blacks) Stonefly Nymph View 6 Pictures
Collected March 29, 2005 from in
Added to Troutnut.com by on April 7, 2006
Female Amphinemura (Tiny Winter Blacks) Stonefly AdultFemale Amphinemura (Tiny Winter Blacks) Stonefly Adult View 5 PicturesA few of these tiny stoneflies were among the only species of aquatic insect adults in the air on this particular afternoon, with most of the action coming from a species of Epeorus mayfly. I somehow forgot to photograph this one on the usual ruler, but I recall it was very, very small, with an abdomen no more than 1mm in girth and the body, not counting the wings, probably just 5-7mm long.
Collected September 6, 2006 from in
Added to Troutnut.com by on October 3, 2006
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