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> > Instant Baetid Nymph Patterns, Page 2

This topic is about the Mayfly Family Baetidae

"These little critters supplant the importance of many other well-known mayfly hatches."

-Fred Arbona in Mayflies, the Angler, and the Trout


Arbona did not overestimate these critters. Their great numbers and multiple broods each season make up for their size, which is rarely larger than size 16 and often smaller than size 20.

Hardly mentioned in angling literature prior to the middle of the last century, baetids have become increasingly important to anglers, rivaling any other family of mayflies in this regard. This is largely due to the extension of fishing seasons that now include the early and late periods when this familyís species usually dominate hatching activity. Another important reason is the tremendous improvement in tackle allowing more practical imitation of these little mayflies. The dramatic ecological changes in many of our watersheds and the subsequent impact this has had on the makeup of taxa populations is also a factor.

Taxonomically speaking, this is a most unruly family. The entomological community seems to be perpetually reclassifying its genera and species to the chagrin of many anglers. These changes are not capricious. The reason is older nomenclatures haven't provided the taxonomic flexibility required as more becomes known about the complexities of baetid relationships. Classification of this familyís genera and species is very much a work in progress. The changes have been so extensive that it is beyond the scope of this hatch page to track the taxonomic history effectively without interjecting even more confusion. If you are frustrated by the inability to find some of the old familiar names, you're not alone. Rest assured these popular hatches are listed here, just under the latest classifications. The old famous names are referenced in their hatch pages.

Common baetid hatches with a national distribution are the species Acentrella turbida, Baetis brunneicolor, and Baetis tricaudatus. In the West, Baetis bicaudatus, Diphetor hageni and Plauditus punctiventris can also be common. In the East and the Midwest, look for Baetis intercalaris and Plauditus dubius. The species Iswaeon anoka is important in both the West and Midwest. Some of the Procloeon and Anafroptilum (prev. Centroptilum) species are coming to the increasing notice of anglers across the country.

Stillwater anglers are likely to run across Callibaetis ferrugineus ferrugineus in the East and Midwest. Western anglers will find Callibaetis californicus and Callibaetis ferrugineus hageni to be very important.

Streamside identification of these mayflies to specific and often even generic level has always been difficult. This is now even more so as new taxonomic evidence has shown hind wing conformation (or lack of hind wings) and other features are less dependable as ways to tell the genera apart. Many of the lesser-known species probably produce excellent local hatches but have not caught enough attention to be properly recognized by anglers. The lesson is that we should not assume anything about the identity of many Baetidae hatches we come across; they may not even be in the Baetis genus, let alone familiar species. Read more...

There are 80 more specimens...

The Discussion

EntomanFebruary 5th, 2012, 2:22 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Tony -

It may sound strange, but I have found that a black post (or wing) shows up really well, especially when there is some glare on the water.

Not at all, you are absolutely right. In my attractor box, I keep my parachute Adams area well stocked with them, and I also use them on a few patterns whose hatches can do that to me as well. Casting into a reflected sunset, it's the only color you can see. Ralph Cutter ties a "bivisible' Paradun with the front half of the post white and the rear half black (or is it the other way around) to cover all poor light situations. Anyway, I tried 'em and wasn't too happy. Besides not liking the looks of them (which shouldn't be a factor but somehow always ends up being one with me), I found that the two that close together tended to cancel each other out a bit at distance; at least for my eyes.

My observation (for what it's worth):
Most years, these Small Olives begin to hatch a few weeks behind the Little Black Stones, about two weeks before the QG and Grannom and almost a full month before our P adoptiva and E subvaria do.

Interesting, Tony. Are you just talking your homewaters in PA or do you think this is fairly universal in the East?
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
GutcutterFebruary 5th, 2012, 7:28 pm
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Interesting, Tony. Are you just talking your homewaters in PA or do you think this is fairly universal in the East?


My home waters - Central and North Central PA.
Maybe Bruce, Louis, Shawn, Afish or somebody else can chime in here...
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
MartinlfFebruary 5th, 2012, 10:54 pm
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 2919
No need, Tony. You're on the money. See you on SC in March, if not sooner.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
PaulRobertsFebruary 6th, 2012, 12:35 pm
Colorado

Posts: 1776
Tony,

I like the glass bead idea -not too heavy. I tend to start light bc I can then add weight to the dropper if needed.

I've got some dark dun posted parachute Baetis I like very much, but lighting matters. I should try black this year. Indicator flies are next up anyway.

That emergence progression is spot on for Central NY too. Actual dates likely differ a bit though.
PaulRobertsFebruary 16th, 2012, 10:57 pm
Colorado

Posts: 1776
Here's my latest Baetis "indicator" tie to be fished ahead of a Baetid dropper. It's a size 16. The only real addition to my previous pattern is a bolstered tail (the weak link in an indicator fly) -using splayed fibettes under an Antron shuck. I credit Matt (WBranch) for the tailing change as he uses this tail on his Comparaduns.


I will be making some black posts and possibly black/red posts too.
Feathers5February 17th, 2012, 9:53 am
Posts: 287
Interesting, Tony. Are you just talking your homewaters in PA or do you think this is fairly universal in the East?


My home waters - Central and North Central PA.
Maybe Bruce, Louis, Shawn, Afish or somebody else can chime in here...


Oh my gosh, yes, black posts are so much easier to see. Been there and done that while fishing right along side of Antonio. Speaking just for myself, I have a lot of trouble seeing red posts. I use either white, cream or black.
Bruce
PaulRobertsFebruary 17th, 2012, 1:01 pm
Colorado

Posts: 1776
Thanks, Bruce. I'll play around with posts some.
EntomanFebruary 17th, 2012, 1:48 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Nice fly, Paul!

Bruce - The hot reds and oranges are really good for non-glare situations where the naturals are in foam lines (or so thick they form their own foam line). For example, the Missouri near Craig, Montana is rife with foam lines full of fish and critters. I've relied heavily on flies like Paul's there, as they're the only ones you can see!:) I agree nothing beats black for glare, but that's a different problem. Luckily, there's a lot of time where none of these problems are an issue. That's when I prefer to match the natural's wing color as closely as possible.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
GldstrmSamFebruary 17th, 2012, 3:19 pm
Fairbanks, Alaska

Posts: 212
I've heard a lot about "indicator" flies and I was wondering how often it is to have a fish strike the indicator fly.
There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. ~Patrick F. McManus
PaulRobertsFebruary 17th, 2012, 3:55 pm
Colorado

Posts: 1776
If the dry fishing is good enough, that's what I do. If nymphs are key, that's what I concentrate on. Nymph and dry together are not the best of both worlds.

Dries are good indicators where fish are feeding on both nymphs and adults, and where waters are calm enough that a larger indicator can spook them. The Baetis emergences are a time I often use the dry as indicator, and I do catch fish on both, but it seems I get larger ones on the nymph.

If there is no surface activity to worry about then, on flat water, I use a yarn indicator which lands quietly and is simply more buoyant an indicator than a dry fly.

I occasionally do some shallow water prospecting with a larger indicator dry (#12 or #14) and nymph dropper, but again both presentations suffer for it. I'm more apt to use, or switch to one or the other as I figure the day out, simply bc I'm more directly effective with one or the other.

When nymphing with regular non-fly indicators, I sometimes have trout smack the indicator. But they are more often small fish.
MartinlfFebruary 17th, 2012, 10:01 pm
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 2919
Paul, like you, I much prefer a one fly rig when it's working. But I've taken a few stubborn fish by adding a dropper to the dry, and it sure is satisfying to finally get them to take something. I'm also intrigued with Kurt's system for fishing the nymph only, just subsurface, with a bit of putty, and may give that a go this year, especially in the hour before the hatch starts.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
GldstrmSamFebruary 17th, 2012, 10:15 pm
Fairbanks, Alaska

Posts: 212
Thanks a lot Paul!! Helpful as all ways.
There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. ~Patrick F. McManus
Feathers5February 21st, 2012, 10:57 am
Posts: 287
Tony,

I like the glass bead idea -not too heavy. I tend to start light bc I can then add weight to the dropper if needed.

I've got some dark dun posted parachute Baetis I like very much, but lighting matters. I should try black this year. Indicator flies are next up anyway.

That emergence progression is spot on for Central NY too. Actual dates likely differ a bit though.


Paul. I don't seem to have any luck with glass beadhead flies. I tied a few nymphs with an olive glass bead last year for baetis and I got a cold response. Do you get a consistent reponse to them?
Bruce
PaulRobertsFebruary 21st, 2012, 1:25 pm
Colorado

Posts: 1776
Bruce, I've not tried glass beads. So many fun options out there though.

You're welcome, Sam.
MartinlfMarch 6th, 2013, 3:14 pm
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 2919
This thread allowed me to catch several fish that refused dry flies this year. I tied Paul's number 2 nymph pattern on page 1 of this thread, subbing Coq de Leon for the woodduck, since I hate it when the fish chew the tails off, and I'm using a Gonzo style poly yarn wingcase, some with a bit of flash. The CDL allows me to fish the fly on the surface pretty easily, even when it's tied on a heavy hook. The fish have taken it both ways, under, with a greased leader and a bit of putty, and fished in the film. I'm looking at Kurt's fly too, and will tie it eventually. Thanks, guys!
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
SayfuMarch 6th, 2013, 4:07 pm
Posts: 560I use a glass bead on all of my dries...slide one on, and you have the head already created, with no crowding of the head, no lacquer in the eye, and the hackle is easily secured off behind the bead. No whip finish even needed, A double under knot I will call it, and done. Thread doesn't show. And the extra small plastic bead (XSM) will often fit on a #12 dryfly hook...about this size (o)
PaulRobertsMarch 7th, 2013, 12:17 pm
Colorado

Posts: 1776
Awesome, Louis!
Page:12

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