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Updates from May 15, 2007

Photos by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #62 and Enfield Creek in New York

 From Mystery Creek # 62 in New York.
Date TakenMay 15, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
 From Enfield Creek in Treman Park in New York.
Date TakenMay 15, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
 From Enfield Creek in Treman Park in New York.
Date TakenMay 15, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
 From Enfield Creek in Treman Park in New York.
Date TakenMay 15, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the West Branch of the Delaware River, Mystery Creek #62, and Enfield Creek in New York

Brachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis) Caddisfly AdultBrachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis) Caddisfly Adult View 9 PicturesThe wings of this specimen were pale tan, almost white, when I collected it, and the body was of the lighter "apple green" from which this species gets its common name. Everything turned much darker by the time I got it home and under the camera.

The wings look even darker in some of these pictures because the background is black and the wings are unusually translucent. You can see that in one of the pictures where the body easily through the wings. They're really a light, translucent gray, which is still far from the pale tan of the same fly when it was freshly emerged.
Collected May 15, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Hydropsyche aenigma (Spotted Sedge) Caddisfly AdultHydropsyche aenigma (Spotted Sedge) Caddisfly Adult View 18 PicturesThese big caddisflies were tempting trout as they wriggled out of their shucks (
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Shuck: The shed exoskeleton left over when an insect molts into its next stage or instar. Most often it describes the last nymphal or pupal skin exited during emergence into a winged adult.
)
, while others skated across the water at a medium pace, probably egg-laying.
Collected May 15, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Sweltsa onkos (Sallfly) Stonefly AdultSweltsa onkos (Sallfly) Stonefly Adult View 8 PicturesI'm just guessing this is Chloroperlidae, since it's little and yellow. If anyone has a less haphazard identification, feel free to post it.
Collected May 15, 2007 from Mystery Creek #62 in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Apatania (Early Smoky Wing Sedges) Caddisfly AdultApatania (Early Smoky Wing Sedges) Caddisfly Adult View 7 PicturesThis one actually had a medium tan body when it emerged. By the time I took the picture it was dark as night. I was actually looking through my box of specimens trying to figure out where that tan one I caught disappeared to. Then I realized this is it.
Collected May 15, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Male Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly SpinnerMale Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly Spinner View 10 PicturesI collected a female dun on the same day that probably belongs to the same species as this spinner.
Collected May 15, 2007 from Enfield Creek in Treman Park in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Female Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly DunFemale Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly Dun View 7 PicturesThis dun comes from the same location, and is about the same size, so is presumably the same species as this male spinner.
Collected May 15, 2007 from Enfield Creek in Treman Park in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Male Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly DunMale Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly Dun View 7 PicturesThis Epeorus dun managed to emerge successfully even though it had apparently long several legs at some point and only partially grown them back.
Collected May 15, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007

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