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Closeup insects from Mongaup Creek

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Male Epeorus pleuralis (Quill Gordon) Mayfly SpinnerMale Epeorus pleuralis (Quill Gordon) Mayfly Spinner View 10 PicturesI spent (Spent: The wing position of many aquatic insects when they fall on the water after mating. The wings of both sides lay flat on the water. The word may be used to describe insects with their wings in that position, as well as the position itself.) most of the day looking for Epeorus pluralis duns or spinners without any luck on the major Catskill rivers. Finally in the evening I arrived at a small stream somebody had recommended, and when I got out of the car I was happy to find that I had parked in the middle of a cloud of male spinners.
Collected April 19, 2006 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 22, 2006
Female Baetis (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly DunFemale Baetis (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Dun View 7 PicturesThis little early-season dun molted into this spinner after I photographed her.
Collected April 19, 2006 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 21, 2006
Cottidae (Sculpins) Sculpin AdultCottidae (Sculpins) Fish Adult View 7 PicturesThis seems to be a mottled sculpin, Cottus bairdi. Normally this species is more mottled.
Collected May 6, 2007 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Lepidostoma (Little Brown Sedges) Little Brown Sedge LarvaLepidostoma (Little Brown Sedges) Little Brown Sedge Larva View 6 PicturesThis one got a little bit damaged in the abdomen when I extracted it from its case. That's a delicate job.
Collected May 6, 2007 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Rhithrogena impersonata (Dark Red Quill) Mayfly NymphRhithrogena impersonata (Dark Red Quill) Mayfly Nymph View 6 PicturesThis was the only Rhithrogena specimen in a large sample of nymphs from a small Catskill stream. It looks virtually identical to Rhithrogena impersonata specimens collected in the Midwest, but I didn't get to check the distinguishing features under a microscope.
Collected April 19, 2006 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 21, 2006
Hexatoma True Fly LarvaHexatoma  True Fly Larva View 6 PicturesI'm not sure if this cranefly larva is in the genus Hexatoma or Limnophila, but the habitat suggests Hexatoma. Its coloring is iridescent, and I've never heard of that before. However, there is an insect virus genus Iridovirus which can infect craneflies and causes iridescence. It has not been reported in this region as far as I can tell, but perhaps it is the culprit. It makes for beautiful pictures.
Collected April 19, 2006 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 21, 2006
Tallaperla (Roachflies) Stonefly NymphTallaperla (Roachflies) Stonefly Nymph View 6 PicturesThis is the first specimen of the Peltoperlidae stonefly family that I've collected. It's very small and probably an early instar (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.), but I'm not choosy about new bugs.
Collected April 19, 2006 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 21, 2006
Ephemerella aurivillii Mayfly NymphEphemerella aurivillii  Mayfly Nymph View 6 PicturesThis specimen was collected together with a lighter one of the same species.

It resembles another specimen from about 1300 miles away in Wisconsin, which I tentatively called Ephemerella needhami. This one has much less prominent abdominal tubercles (
A few (not all) of the abdominal tubercles on this Ephemerella needhami nymph are circled.  They are especially large in this species.
A few (not all) of the abdominal tubercles on this Ephemerella needhami nymph are circled. They are especially large in this species.
Tubercle: Various peculiar little bumps or projections on an insect. Their character is important for the identification of many kinds of insects, such as the nymphs of Ephemerellidae mayflies.
)
. It may be that they're both the same species and I don't have my identifications straight.
Collected April 19, 2006 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 21, 2006
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