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Scientific name search:

Little Dark Hendricksons

Scientific Names
MatchScientific Name
***Serratella levis
***Serratella micheneri
***Ephemerella needhami
***Serratella teresa
**Teloganopsis deficiens
**Ephemerella tibialis
*Serratella serrata

Like most common names, "Little Dark Hendrickson" can refer to more than one taxon. They're previewed below, along with 4 specimens. For more detail click through to the scientific names.

Mayfly Species Serratella levis

These are often called Little Dark Hendricksons.

Mayfly Species Serratella micheneri

These are often called Little Dark Hendricksons.

Mayfly Species Ephemerella needhami

These are often called Little Dark Hendricksons.
This small and slightly noteworthy mayfly appears during the finest hours of the year. Ernest Schwiebert describes an Ephemerella needhami day in Matching the Hatch:

"It was a wonderul morning, with a sky of indescribable blue and big, clean-looking cumulus clouds, and the water was sparkling and alive. You have seen the water with that lively look; you have also seen it dead and uninviting in a way that dampens the enthusiasm the moment you wade out into the current."


I have not fished a needhami emergence, but the exquisite nymphs show up often (though never abundantly) in my samples.
Ephemerella needhami (Little Dark Hendrickson) Mayfly NymphEphemerella needhami (Little Dark Hendrickson) Mayfly Nymph View 6 PicturesI photographed three strange striped Ephemerella nymphs from the same trip on the same river: this one, a brown one, and a very very striped one. I have tentatively put them all in Ephemerella needhami for now.
Collected June 9, 2005 from in
Added to Troutnut.com by on May 26, 2006
Ephemerella needhami (Little Dark Hendrickson) Mayfly DunEphemerella needhami (Little Dark Hendrickson) Mayfly Dun View 7 PicturesSee the comments for an interesting discussion of the identification of this dun.
Collected June 1, 2007 from in
Added to Troutnut.com by on June 4, 2007

Mayfly Species Serratella teresa

These are often called Little Dark Hendricksons.

Mayfly Species Teloganopsis deficiens

These are sometimes called Little Dark Hendricksons.
Anglers in western Wisconsin, where these little flies hatch in good numbers on summer rivers, have termed them "Darth Vaders" because of the very dark color of their wings.

Until recently, this species was known as Serratella deficiens.
Teloganopsis deficiens (Little Black Quill) Mayfly NymphTeloganopsis deficiens (Little Black Quill) Mayfly Nymph View 6 PicturesThis nymph has tiny, barely detectable tubercles (
A few (not all) of the abdominal tubercles on this Ephemerella needhami nymph are circled.  They are especially large in this species.
A few (not all) of the abdominal tubercles on this Ephemerella needhami nymph are circled. They are especially large in this species.
Tubercle: Various peculiar little bumps or projections on an insect. Their character is important for the identification of many kinds of insects, such as the nymphs of Ephemerellidae mayflies.
)
on its abdominal segments, and I could not find the maxillary palpi. I have tentatively guessed that it is Serratella deficiens.
Collected June 9, 2005 from in
Added to Troutnut.com by on May 26, 2006

Mayfly Species Ephemerella tibialis

These are sometimes called Little Dark Hendricksons.
Ehhemerella tibialis (Little Western Red Quill, Little Western Dark Hendrickson) is a common western species that can be very important at times. It is perhaps also one of the most confusing species. Unlike it's western generic counterparts the species is described as dark and their females produce dark eggs. Until recently, it was classified in the Serratella genus with species that share these traits. Regardless, it is the only small, dark ephemerellid the western angler is likely to find important. Favorite patterns used for size 18 Pale Morning Dun hatches tied in eastern Dark Hendrickson colors should be the ticket.

As with many of it's sister species it is widely adaptable and may be variable in its appearance. Scientific literature and many angling sources describe it as a small dark mayfly. Not everybody agrees. Ralph Cutter, West Coast author of several angler/entomology books and articles describes it in Sierra Trout Guide as a much larger pale mayfly and dubs it the Creamy Orange Dun. He also mentions the nymph as being easy to recognize by the feint dorsal (Dorsal: Top.) stripe running down its back and its often fiery brownish red color. These descriptions also match a variation of the ubiquitous and common Ephemerella excrucians.

Mayfly Species Serratella serrata

These are very rarely called Little Dark Hendricksons.
This locally important species is rarely mentioned in fly fishing literature, and what little information is given is identical to that for Teloganopsis deficiens. Knopp and Cormier say both species can produce good hatches.
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