Troutnut.com Fly Fishing for Trout Home
User Password
or register.
Scientific name search:

> > Looking for a new reel

NamelessherApril 8th, 2013, 5:53 pm
Posts: 2I have been in the market for a new reel. Have been interested in Lamson, Allen, Orvis Etc... I also saw a reel on facebook for a company called Taylor reels www.taylorreels.com that I am really interested in. Any recommendations? Has anyone used a Taylor Reel?
Kschaefer3April 9th, 2013, 9:05 am
St. Paul, MN

Posts: 376
Can you give any more specifics? Target species? Price range? I have a few Lamson reels and I am a huge fan. I typically stay to the lower end of their price range and think the quality is great. Konics are nice, but they are cast not forged so they are softer. I have dropped one and had the frame bend on me, but I still think they are a great reel and recommend them often.
MartinlfApril 9th, 2013, 2:25 pm
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 2998
I'll second the Lamson recommendation.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
IkeApril 11th, 2013, 8:43 am
MN

Posts: 14
i have a lamson konic and a cabelas RLS+ and have been very happy with both so far. they're good quality and both pretty well priced.id recommend either of them.
SayfuApril 12th, 2013, 9:54 am
Posts: 560Here's my deal on trout reels. I'd as soon they made a decent click drag reel that I could make a low setting on, just enough tension so that no over run of line when I pulled line out. That would be the most trouble free reel I could own, and I do own a number of them, the old Hardy reels. The problem with the lesser priced disc drag reels, is....if you make a low setting like everyone should for trout, the drag nob is easily moved to a tighter setting. Any bump can change the setting. That is what I would check first. Even good sized trout I often end up just stripping, and letting out line with my hand, putting pressure on the fish with the rod, not the reel. Having said that, I would goggle in Fly fishing discounts. I buy lots of equipment from them. It is a fly shop on the East Coast that has an online discount business as well. As an example, I just bought a Hardy 7 1/2 ft. graphite 4wt 4 piece for $169 and no tax. Then they threw in a disc drag large arbor reel, and a 4wt WF line that they are putting on for me with backing!! If you need the correct online address I can get it for you.
NamelessherApril 18th, 2013, 5:49 pm
Posts: 2I own a hardy reel and like it. I guess I am always in the market for something new. The new reel is for trout. I am looking for something quality yet affordable. Less than $150.
CutbowApril 18th, 2013, 6:45 pm
Post Falls, Idaho

Posts: 38
@Namelessher - The Loop Xact Fly Reel is your best choice in that price range. If you don't like that then buy a $30 Okuma reel. Most trout reels on the market are garbage. I agree with Sayfu, the problem is that no major reel manufacturer agrees with us. Stay away from Ross and just about every other high priced big name and you'll be fine.
"Once you catch your first fish on a fly you won't care about any other kind of fishing!"
LastchanceApril 18th, 2013, 7:19 pm
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
I love Lamson products, but I also have a click and pawl Pocket Water Reel from L. L. Bean. I think it's a great small rod reel.
Bruce
EntomanApril 18th, 2013, 7:54 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
I love my old Hardy LRH's (before House of Hardy when they were still Hardy Bros., Ltd) and still fish them. Light, dependable, smooth. And the sound! I wished somebody could come up with the same reel in a large arbor... Gotta admit line retrieval is a big handicap, especially with a big boy who has you almost to the spindle. Talking trout, all this concern about drag you see in so many conversations makes me wonder if using the rod and hands to control resistance is becoming a lost (or undiscovered) art with many. Any drag that's set light enough to protect delicate tippets is going to overrun on a fast fish if you don't know how to use your rod and hands (or freeze/panic as many do).
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
SayfuApril 18th, 2013, 8:12 pm
Posts: 560
Gary Borger had a good article long ago on the use of the rod for drag. There was a drawing of an angler and the rod displayed at the different anglers. As I remember a 60 degree angle lift of the rod produced maximum pressure to where the full length of the rod provided drag especially the butt section. As you went higher, and straight up to 90 degrees you were utilizing just the tip section, and no longer the butt of the rod. Lowering the rod to just above straight at a fish allows line to peal off the reel, and a bent tip section of the rod to protect your tippet from breaking. Thus you can lower and raise the rod quickly, changing the drag pressure, and leaving the reel on a lt setting. The benefits of using the rod really come into play when you have a fresh fish in close thinking you might be able to net it, and it suddenly bursts off. A quick drop of the rod allows minimum drag pressure, and line to run out. And Kurt mentions the use of your hand on the reel. I tend to use the finger on the line for additional pressure.
EntomanApril 18th, 2013, 8:48 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
I agree, Jere. I meant use of the hands in a general sense - fingers on the line, reel, etc. It depends on reel design, the fish, and what it's doing. If a fish takes off on my Hardys, I'll feather the spool with my fingers - not to apply more pressure on the fish but rather to prevent an overrun. On a wide arbor single post design, you can do it on the rim, but I prefer a finger or two directly on the line in the spool. When I hear the term "palming" come up, an eyebrow raises. assuming the fish is in close and on the reel, I'll usually have a finger hooked over the line to clamp down a little if need be, especially when I have a net in the other hand.

Namelessher- Welcome to the forum! Any of the names you mentioned are fine and I agree with Bruce & John on the Lamson & Loop products as some of the best of the lot in the affordable sector. Many of them are way over-engineered for trout and promise too much (or more than needed) for their price category. There are also some very expensive reels capable of disappointment. Then there's design philosophy; some are Swiss watches some are German tanks. It's all about trade-offs.

"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Kschaefer3April 19th, 2013, 9:09 am
St. Paul, MN

Posts: 376
I was just in at the fly shop the other day. I was with a friend looking at lower end reels for a 6 wt he found at his cabin. The Echo Ion was a surprisingly nice reel for $80. More solid than I would have expected.
GutcutterApril 19th, 2013, 10:45 pm
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
...you can lower and raise the rod quickly, changing the drag pressure, and leaving the reel on a lt setting. The benefits of using the rod really come into play when you have a fresh fish in close thinking you might be able to net it, and it suddenly bursts off. A quick drop of the rod allows minimum drag pressure, and line to run out...


Rapidly changing the "drag pressure" causes a sudden increase or decrease in the strain on the tippet, knot to the fly, and knot to the leader. You don't want this to happen.
The key to landing a fish that is larger than the breaking strength of the tippet is to keep steady, even pressure just below the breaking strength of the line. Knowing just how much pressure is 75-85% of the breaking strength is an art gained only with experience.
Slowly adjusting that pressure, such as with the palming action Kurt describes, or slowly increasing the drag knob is paramount to whipping a large fish on light line.
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
EntomanApril 20th, 2013, 2:20 am
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
The key to landing a fish that is larger than the breaking strength of the tippet is to keep steady, even pressure just below the breaking strength of the line. Knowing just how much pressure is 75-85% of the breaking strength is an art gained only with experience.

Well said, Tony.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Martin595July 6th, 2013, 3:32 am
Posts: 5The choice is reel is very important decision. The vintage reel is best option as it It has the knurled metal knob, metal spool case and spool, and paperwork.
Powerheads
JoeinnmJuly 15th, 2013, 12:03 pm
Albuquerque

Posts: 3
Check this out: http://www.fishenchantment.com/forum/entry.php?40-Qualifly-Reel-Review
RisenflyAugust 6th, 2013, 1:47 pm
Pennsylvania

Posts: 9
Check us out and feel free to email me with any questions at risenflyco@yahoo.com


Our Ichthus reels should fit the bill. Machined aluminum, cork drag, and lots of happy customers so far.


www.risenfly.com
www.risenfly.com


Fly reels, lines, boxes and accessories. Rods coming in 2014!
SayfuAugust 7th, 2013, 4:34 pm
Posts: 560My question to students in HS is "how can I land a 10 lb. fish on 4 lb test breaking strength line?" They seldom ever get it. Because the fish floats, has an air bladder. Lift it up out of the water, and the line can break. Too bad few are mfging click drag reels anymore.
FalsiflyAugust 7th, 2013, 4:59 pm
Hayward, WI.

Posts: 657


Any object, wholly or partially immersed in a fluid, is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object.

Archimedes of Syracuse

Falsifly
When asked what I just caught that monster on I showed him. He put on his magnifiers and said, "I can't believe they can see that."

Quick Reply

You have to be logged in to post on the forum. It's this easy:
Username:          Email:

Password:    Confirm Password:

I am at least 13 years old and agree to the rules.

Related Discussions

TitleRepliesLast Reply
Re: Hardy cane rods
In Gear Talk by Flebow
3Oct 22, 2011
by Wbranch
Re: Tenkara
In General Discussion by Wbranch
2Apr 3, 2018
by Wbranch
Re: Steelhead coloration
(5 more)

In the Photography Board by Wbranch
9Mar 6, 2017
by Wbranch
Re: brand new to fly fishing. reel question
In General Discussion by Lalaleeza
2Oct 20, 2015
by Wbranch
Re: Sage, Lamson Konic, or Other?
In Gear Talk by GldstrmSam
11Jan 14, 2013
by GldstrmSam
mechanical help with G Loomis Venture Reel
In Gear Talk by Willg180
0
Re: Sierra Trading Post
In General Discussion by Martinlf
3Apr 2, 2009
by CaseyP
Re: I lost a MONSTER trout!
In Fishing Reports by Mcflyangler
2Dec 26, 2016
by Falsifly
Looking For Battenkill III Reel or Spool
In Gear Talk by Bellfly
0
Re: Cheap Reels High Performance???
In Gear Talk by Obtuseangle
24Apr 20, 2008
by Taxon
Most Recent Posts
Re: Selecting a reel
In Beginner Help by AllanM83 (Red_green_h replied)
Re: Views from the Parks Highway
In Site Updates by Troutnut
Re: The Boys Were Back in Town Chapter 5, part 2 of "Town and Country"
In the Photography Board by Jmd123
Re: When the hatch don't match
In General Discussion by Red_green_h (Jmd123 replied)
Re: Glossosoma intermedium or nigrior
In the Saddle-case Maker Genus Glossosoma by Wiflyfisher
Re: MIDGES: who's got a good pattern that works consistently?
In General Discussion by Jmd123
The Boys Were Back in Town, Chapter 5: "Town and Country"
In the Photography Board by Jmd123
Re: Paraleptophlebia mollis spinner
In General Discussion by Martinlf
Ephemerella dorothea dorothea (PED)
In the Identify This! Board by Wiflyfisher
Re: Trip report from my Idaho mule deer hunt in 2019
In Site Updates by Troutnut