Troutnut.com Fly Fishing for Trout Home
User Password
or register.
Scientific name search:

> > Ironodes sp.

Millcreek has attached these 6 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
View Full SizeView Full Size (3.8X larger)
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
View Full SizeView Full Size (1.8X larger)
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
View Full SizeView Full Size (3.7X larger)
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
View Full SizeView Full Size (1.6X larger)
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
View Full SizeView Full Size (2.1X larger)
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
Ironodes nymph. 11 mm (excluding cerci). Collected May 11, 2010. In alcohol.
Shown Full Size
Mouthparts of nymph.
Mouthparts of nymph.
MillcreekNovember 17th, 2014, 8:10 pm
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 332
The nymphs are members of the Heptageniidae family and are easily identified to genus. They have only two caudal filaments (tails), which narrows it down to Anepeorus, Epeorus and Ironodes. Anepeorus has interfacing setae on the caudal filaments. Ironodes has no interfacing setae on the caudal filaments . Ironodes has a pair of median tubercles on each dorsal segment while Epeorus doesn't.

While easy enough to identify to genus I've only been able to find a description of Ironodes lepidus by Day in "New Species and Notes on California Mayflies (Ephemeroptera)" (1952). This leaves several species undescribed as nymphs that have been reported as occurring in California. I. californicus and I. nitidus have been reported in California and Mayfly Central lists I. arctus and I. geminatus as possibilities in the northwest United States. If anybody has any knowledge of these larvae info would be much appreciated.

The nymphs are usually found in smaller tributaries of the Russian River.They were collected in riffles or shallow glides with moderate to fast flow and a substrate of large gravel and cobble. They are most common in the spring and and early summer months. When ready to emerge they can be seen on the downstream side of large rocks where they crawl up nearly to the waterline, grasp the rock firmly and molt as subimagos. I had some male adults but never got around to keying them out and haven't been able to find the vial with them in it again.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
KonchuNovember 21st, 2014, 6:58 pm
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 496
Jacobus & McCafferty (2002) suggested some color characteristics that might
be useful for species diagnosis, but such characters often are variable or
subject to fading. Leave these at the genus level.

Jacobus LM; McCafferty WP. 2002. Analysis of some historically unfamiliar
Canadian mayflies (Ephemeroptera). Canadian-Entomologist
134(2):141-155.
MillcreekNovember 21st, 2014, 7:32 pm
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 332
I figured I wasn't going to get very far attempting to ID these to species. Day gives some minor differences in size and coloration as distinguishing characteristics in "Aquatic Insects of California" but as you mentioned above these seem like they would be variable. Thanks for the info.

Mark
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein

Quick Reply

You have to be logged in to post on the forum. It's this easy:
Username:          Email:

Password:    Confirm Password:

I am at least 13 years old and agree to the rules.

Related Discussions

TitleRepliesLast Reply
Re: Fallceon spp.
(15 more)

In the Identify This! Board by Millcreek
4Nov 21, 2014
by Millcreek
Re: Serratella micheneri nymphs
In the Photography Board by Millcreek
2Oct 13, 2014
by Millcreek
Re: Epeorus sp. (longimanus?)
In the Identify This! Board by Millcreek
9Dec 14, 2014
by Entoman
Paracloeodes minutus
In the Photography Board by Millcreek
0
Re: identification needed
In Rhithrogena impersonata Mayfly Nymph by Kinza
2Feb 6, 2017
by Crepuscular
Acentrella insignificans nymphs
(1 more)

In the Photography Board by Millcreek
0
Re: mayfly website change: Ephemeroptera Galactica
In General Discussion by Konchu
2Nov 12, 2012
by Entoman
Re: Ephemerella maculata
(1 more)

In the Photography Board by Millcreek
3Apr 12, 2015
by PaulRoberts
Baetis alius
In the Identify This! Board by Millcreek
0
Re: My setae style chart,Kurt ,Luke.
In the Identify This! Board by Brookyman
4Dec 18, 2012
by Brookyman
Most Recent Posts
Re: Little Manistee
In Fishing Reports by Summer_doug
Re: Floating line, WF or DT
In Gear Talk by Red_green_h (Partsman replied)
Re: Iowa Driftless
In General Discussion by KevinB (Red_green_h replied)
Re: Need an excuse to buy new rods
In Gear Talk by Barbaube (Red_green_h replied)
Re: Rio Puerco, Northern New Mexico
In Fishing Reports by Red_green_h
Re: Euro Nymph Rod
In Gear Talk by Wbranch (Barbaube replied)
Re: Firehole Dry Fly hooks
In Fly Tying by Iasgair (Hendo replied)
Re: Fishing Rod Suggestions
In Gear Talk by Princemoga (Troutbum32 replied)
Re: help with midge adult
In the Identify This! Board by Cherylkorca (Taxon replied)