Troutnut.com Fly Fishing for Trout Home
User Password
or register.
Scientific name search:

Troutnut.com User Gladeriaen

Send Gladeriaen a Private Message

To do this you have to log in at the top of the page. If you haven't registered yet, it's this easy:

Username:          Email:

Password:    Confirm Password:

I am at least 13 years old and agree to the rules.

Gladeriaen's Favorite Troutnut.com Pictures

Page:123
Hundreds of cased caddisfly larvae live on this log in a small brook trout stream.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin.
Hundreds of cased caddisfly larvae live on this log in a small brook trout stream.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenApr 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This picture from below shows a stillborn Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) dun drifting on the surface amidst a number of shed pupal skins from Brachycentrus caddisflies which were heavily hatching that day.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) and Caddisfly Species Brachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis). From the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
This picture from below shows a stillborn (
This stillborn Ephemerella subvaria dun is trapped in its shuck.
This stillborn Ephemerella subvaria dun is trapped in its shuck.
Stillborn: In fly fishing, a stillborn insect is one which got stuck in its nymphal or pupal shuck during emergence and floats helplessly on the surface instead of flying away. It is a specific class of cripple, although it is sometimes used interchangeably with that term.
)
Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) dun drifting on the surface amidst a number of shed pupal skins from Brachycentrus caddisflies which were heavily hatching that day.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) and Caddisfly Species Brachycentrus appalachia (Apple Caddis).
Date TakenApr 19, 2006
Date AddedApr 22, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
This picture came out poorly, but it still shows pretty well just what effective tools those rear prolegs are for caddis larvae to grip the rocks.  It can be surprisingly hard to pick them up when they're grabbing onto something.  Rhyacophila fuscula (Green Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from Mystery Creek #62 in New York
This picture came out poorly, but it still shows pretty well just what effective tools those rear prolegs are for caddis larvae to grip the rocks. It can be surprisingly hard to pick them up when they're grabbing onto something.

Rhyacophila fuscula (Green Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from Mystery Creek #62 in New York
Page:123
Most Recent Posts
Re: To Handle Or Not To Handle When Releasing A Trout
In General Discussion by Hellgramite (Jmd123 replied)
Re: Quick evening trip to the mountains
In Site Updates by Troutnut (Peter21 replied)
Re: Tackle on Jets
In Gear Talk by Davem (Martinlf replied)
Re: Indiana flying insect ID - Thanksgiving 2017
In the Identify This! Board by Bnorikane (Millcreek replied)
Re: Great streamer action
In Fishing Reports by Wbranch
Re: Aeshna naiad
In the Identify This! Board by Millcreek (Jmd123 replied)
Re: Introduction
In Beginner Help by David82nd (Iasgair replied)
Re: using a size 5 reel for smaller 4x
In Gear Talk by Yubablue (Iasgair replied)
Ultimate fishing simulator
In General Discussion by Ibarasan
Re: Brechmorhoga naiad
In the Identify This! Board by Millcreek (Creno replied)