Troutnut.com Fly Fishing for Trout Home
User Password
or register.
Scientific name search:

> > Crane Prarie Reservoir bugs.

SayfuAugust 28th, 2011, 1:44 pm
Posts: 560I've watched the same tv show several times now. It is hosted by Wayne Van Burger and they are fishing Crane Prairie reservoir in Oregon. The Reservoir is one of those spooky lakes with ghostly looking, standing, dead trees. They are fishing out of a boat with two bait guys using bobber indicators, and a fly guy. After describing the history of the lake, and its fish contents, one of them says, "let's go get some crane bugs." They get out in the weedy shallows, and collect a bunch of these good sized bodied bugs with long legs, heavy femured legs that can angle up higher than the body. The bait guys put them on a bait hook and catch trout with them. But they didn't identify the bugs!! I tried to e-mail Van Burger, and tell him it would have been nice if he would have identified the bugs. Anyone know, or have an idea of what they were from the info I gave you? I just watched the darn show again!
TaxonAugust 28th, 2011, 5:00 pm
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1327
Sayfu-

Most likely Auchenorrhyncha.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
SayfuAugust 28th, 2011, 5:48 pm
Posts: 560
How can I see a picture of a Auchenorrhyncha bug? What is a common name for them? Thanks.
TaxonAugust 28th, 2011, 5:57 pm
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1327
Sayfu-

The common name is Hoppers.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
TaxonAugust 28th, 2011, 5:59 pm
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1327
Sayfu-

The common name is Hoppers. Are you unfamiliar with Google?
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
SayfuAugust 29th, 2011, 2:03 pm
Posts: 560
Thanks, I googled on this site, and didn't find it. Before I google they sure aren't the hoppers that I am familiar with.
SayfuAugust 29th, 2011, 2:12 pm
Posts: 560
And again, thanks for your response. I goggled, and could not find the specific bug they were collecting. Undoubtedly the order, but too many members for me to continue searching. Interesting; these did not appear to be able to hop, or fly.
TroutnutAugust 29th, 2011, 2:16 pm
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2707
I'm not sure about them being leafhoppers, treehoppers, etc. (I wouldn't call them "hoppers" since to most fly fishermen that means "grasshoppers.")

I found a thread on ifish discussing bugs in that reservoir, and everyone's talking about dragonfly nymphs there. I've got pictures of several dragonfly nymphs on this site, but I'm not sure they fit your description. You might also try damselfly nymphs or a Google Image search for Lethocerus.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
SayfuAugust 29th, 2011, 6:06 pm
Posts: 560
entomen!!! I am totally frustrated on how to respond on this thing at times. I could not respond to your email! Frustrating! I went to the site, clicked on forum, and all I got as subjects were the bugs mayflies to stoneflies etc. and nothing titled, lake bug, or what you said to look for! Sounded like it would be it coming from Crane Prairie, but could not bring it up.
EntomanAugust 29th, 2011, 8:36 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Sorry about that. Did my latest PM help?
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
SayfuAugust 30th, 2011, 9:25 am
Posts: 560
I don't think that was the bug. I've seen those big, water bugs. Matter of fact I had a huge dead one in the bottom of my boat when I removed my floor boards. I kept it in my car for this special occasion....I went into the fly shop one day, and there was the "bug man" we called him. He was a guide that I guided with often, and this guy knew the bugs. I went out to the car, and got this bug that was about the size of a humming bird. I brought it in, and said, "Hey Larry, you know what the fish are rising to on the Yakima?...this thing", and I held out this monster. He started lecturing on the details regarding that bug, "that is a water bug", and went on and on about the bug not thinking it was funny at all. The one they were collecting, and they had an easy time getting a bunch of them quickly, had longer legs that angled up above the body..at least several of its legs, and a more prominent head I do believe than the one you showed me. That Larry friend of mine invented the "lightning bug" fly...familiar with the "lightning bug?" Larry Graham was his name.
TaxonAugust 30th, 2011, 2:00 pm
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1327
Okay Sayfu, how about this?

Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
SayfuAugust 30th, 2011, 8:29 pm
Posts: 560Now that looks like it could be it. As my fleeting memory visualizes that critter, it was standing up, and a different view but the legs on that look like it, and the well formed head looks like it...and that looks like a dragon fly nymph, no?
TroutnutAugust 30th, 2011, 9:18 pm
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2707
That is a dragonfly nymph. I'm guessing a dragonfly nymph or a damselfly nymph might be the best bet for your bugs.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
SayfuAugust 31st, 2011, 8:51 am
Posts: 560
Jason,..Wish I were better on this darn computer, because I could have emailed the host of that show had I known how to format an email response, but I gave up, and did not. The bugs they collected were very large. I'd say maybe two inches long was the body, and a big, dragonfly nymph is maybe an inch long is it not? And damsels, that I have matched a lot, are quite small. In the picture that you sent, I could not tell the size of the bug as it was magnified...gomphids comes to mind on the dragon fly, and I know there are several popular species in lakes that get matched. I only know, and the Latin names come and go, for the common aquatics that fly anglers match. Yesterday it was Ephemerella infrequens, and Epeorus Albertae. They were both on the water in good numbers, along with Epeorus spinners.
GONZOAugust 31st, 2011, 10:51 am
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
Hi Sayfu,
The bugs they collected were very large. I'd say maybe two inches long was the body, and a big, dragonfly nymph is maybe an inch long is it not?

The Green Darner (Anax junius) is a common and widespread species of dragonfly with mature nymphs as large as 50-55mm (or about 2").
SayfuAugust 31st, 2011, 10:57 am
Posts: 560
That could well be the bug then. Thanks.
TroutnutAugust 31st, 2011, 12:49 pm
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2707
Jason,..Wish I were better on this darn computer, because I could have emailed the host of that show


I'm not sure why I didn't think of that earlier! I googled the host's name and quickly found the full TV episode online. Here's the show: http://thejoyoffishing.tv/video/tv-episode-cranebows/

Anyway, we got it right. They're dragonfly nymphs.

They start introducing the bugs around the 5:30 mark and show some good close-ups around 6:15. At 6:33 you get a glimpse of some of the bugs in a plastic bottle of water, and can see one of them propel itself upward by jetting water out its abdomen, a telltale dragonfly nymph behavior. 6:42 is a pretty good shot for anyone who wants to try to ID them to family level. They only look to be about an inch long.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
EntomanAugust 31st, 2011, 1:36 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Gonzo -
The Green Darner (Anax junius) is a common and widespread species of dragonfly with mature nymphs as large as 50-55mm (or about 2").


These nymphs can get even bigger. I remember Andy Puyans had one pickled on display in his shop that was at least 3"!

Kurt
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
SlayerJuly 23rd, 2012, 12:09 am
Oregon

Posts: 1
Its a dragonfly nymph

Quick Reply

You have to be logged in to post on the forum. It's this easy:
Username:          Email:

Password:    Confirm Password:

I am at least 13 years old and agree to the rules.

Related Discussions

TitleRepliesLast Reply
Re: i have qustoins
In Gomphidae Dragonfly Nymph by Davisbugg
2Mar 26, 2007
by Martinlf
BQ Nymph
In Neoleptophlebia Mayfly Nymph by Martinlf
0
Re: Perfect Candidate for a Woven Fly
In Agnetina capitata Stonefly Nymph by Flybyknight
4Nov 28, 2007
by Martinlf
Re: Fall Hatches: September - December
In General Discussion by Jesse
4Aug 17, 2012
by Jesse
no hatch
In General Discussion by Artk
0
Re: Identification of a possible Cordulegaster Dragonfly Nymph
In Cordulegaster Dragonfly Nymph by IanB
6Feb 10, 2017
by Taxon
Re: Pseudo Hackle
In Fly Tying by TomMarkert
4May 11, 2015
by NeoDoc
Thoughts on this identification?
In Male Eurylophella Mayfly Spinner by Troutnut
0
Re: Brechmorhoga naiad
In the Identify This! Board by Millcreek
5Nov 22, 2017
by Creno
Re: Ephemerella maculata
(1 more)

In the Photography Board by Millcreek
3Apr 12, 2015
by PaulRoberts
Most Recent Posts
Montana Bound
In General Discussion by Wbranch
Re: Need hatch info for southern Indiana - is this even available?
In the Identify This! Board by Jmd123 (Taxon replied)
Re: Scissors
In Fly Tying by PESCATORE (Martinlf replied)
Peepers
In General Discussion by Wbranch
Re: How did you start fly fishing?
In General Discussion by Summer_doug (Adirman replied)
Re: Low water trouting
In Fishing Reports by Partsman
Re: Indiana stream survey, Phase II
In the Photography Board by Jmd123 (Partsman replied)
Re: NH wet fly
In Fly Tying by Jvand (Partsman replied)
Re: Test to see if this works!
In the Photography Board by Jmd123 (Roguerat replied)
Re: May in the Mason Tract
In Fishing Reports by Summer_doug (Martinlf replied)