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Underwater Pictures from Trout Streams, Page 4

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This simple rubber-legged foam beetle is one of my favorite flies for Arctic grayling.  It's quick to tie so I don't mind losing one or two on snags.  It's durable, so one fly can last a hundred fish or more.  It never needs floatant to ride the surface well.  Most importantly, it catches fish, although grayling often hit almost anything.  The bold profile and attention-grabbing plop of the beetle, I think, draw fish from farther away than a more subtle fly might, and it often draws unusually savage strikes. From the Chatanika River in Alaska.
This simple rubber-legged foam beetle is one of my favorite flies for Arctic grayling. It's quick to tie so I don't mind losing one or two on snags. It's durable, so one fly can last a hundred fish or more. It never needs floatant to ride the surface well. Most importantly, it catches fish, although grayling often hit almost anything. The bold profile and attention-grabbing plop of the beetle, I think, draw fish from farther away than a more subtle fly might, and it often draws unusually savage strikes.
StateAlaska
Date TakenAug 6, 2011
Date AddedAug 7, 2011
AuthorTroutnut
CameraCanon PowerShot D10
 From the Couderay River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenJun 21, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
I spotted this very large leech freely tumbling, and occasionally stopping, along the bottom of a clear, cool trout stream.  I paid careful attention later and spotted two more like it, but this one was the largest -- probably over 7 inches stretched out.

There is one other picture of it.  In this picture: Animal Class Clitellata-Hirudinae (Leeches). From the Namekagon River in Wisconsin.
I spotted this very large leech freely tumbling, and occasionally stopping, along the bottom of a clear, cool trout stream. I paid careful attention later and spotted two more like it, but this one was the largest -- probably over 7 inches stretched out.

There is one other picture of it.

In this picture: Animal Class Clitellata-Hirudinae (Leeches).
Date TakenJun 21, 2006
Date AddedJul 1, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
 From Mystery Creek # 42 in Pennsylvania.
Date TakenMay 28, 2007
Date AddedJun 6, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
This tiny sculpin is the size of a mid-sized mayfly nymph.  In this picture: Fish Order Cottidae (Sculpins). From Fishing Creek in Pennsylvania.
This tiny sculpin is the size of a mid-sized mayfly nymph.

In this picture: Fish Order Cottidae (Sculpins).
Date TakenMay 26, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
 From Fish Creek in Alaska.
StateAlaska
LocationFish Creek
Date TakenSep 5, 2007
Date AddedApr 21, 2011
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
You can see the dwarf dolly I caught in this pool, hanging out after being released, just up/left from the center of the picture.  You can't really tell it's a fish here, though. From Mystery Creek # 170 in Alaska.
You can see the dwarf dolly I caught in this pool, hanging out after being released, just up/left from the center of the picture. You can't really tell it's a fish here, though.
StateAlaska
Date TakenJul 11, 2012
Date AddedJul 14, 2012
AuthorTroutnut
CameraCanon PowerShot D10
Gonzo and I had to wait a few seconds for this snapping turtle to get out of our way before we crossed over a log on his small stream. From Mystery Creek # 42 in Pennsylvania.
Gonzo and I had to wait a few seconds for this snapping turtle to get out of our way before we crossed over a log on his small stream.
Date TakenMay 28, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Mating toads and their eggs in the shallows. From the Neversink River Gorge in New York.
Mating toads and their eggs in the shallows.
Date TakenMay 12, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
These are red-spotted newts, Notophthalmus viridescens viridescens.  Thanks Gonzo for the ID. From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
These are red-spotted newts, Notophthalmus viridescens viridescens. Thanks Gonzo for the ID.
Date TakenMay 13, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Underwater Photo Page:1...345...25
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