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Underwater Pictures from Trout Streams, Page 3

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Underwater Photo Page:1234...25
 From the Mystery Creek # 19 in Wisconsin.
Date TakenFeb 27, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
I tried to photograph this salamander but it kept scurrying away from the camera.  The rocks in this little backwater are covered with a thin layer of very easily disturbed silt, so anywhere I followed it I didn't have much time to photograph before the water was too turbid for a good shot.  This is the best I got.  In this picture: Amphibian Order Caudata (Salamanders). From the East Branch of Trout Brook in New York.
I tried to photograph this salamander but it kept scurrying away from the camera. The rocks in this little backwater are covered with a thin layer of very easily disturbed silt, so anywhere I followed it I didn't have much time to photograph before the water was too turbid for a good shot. This is the best I got.

In this picture: Amphibian Order Caudata (Salamanders).
Date TakenSep 8, 2006
Date AddedOct 4, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
This is my favorite underwater picture so far. It shows a bunch of Simuliidae (black fly) larvae clinging to a rock and swinging in the fast current. There are also at least four visible mayfly nymphs, probably in the family Baetidae.  In this picture: True Fly Family Simuliidae (Black Flies) and Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives). From Eighteenmile Creek in Wisconsin.
This is my favorite underwater picture so far. It shows a bunch of Simuliidae (black fly) larvae clinging to a rock and swinging in the fast current. There are also at least four visible mayfly nymphs, probably in the family Baetidae.

In this picture: True Fly Family Simuliidae (Black Flies) and Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives).
Date TakenMar 19, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
 From the West Branch of Owego Creek in New York.
Date TakenAug 22, 2006
Date AddedAug 23, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Several Baetidae nymphs line up on a rock.  In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives). From Mongaup Creek in New York.
Several Baetidae nymphs line up on a rock.

In this picture: Mayfly Family Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives).
Date TakenApr 19, 2006
Date AddedApr 22, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Underwater moss and riffle bubbles. From the Mystery Creek # 23 in New York.
Underwater moss and riffle bubbles.
Date TakenSep 6, 2006
Date AddedOct 3, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
 From the Couderay River in Wisconsin.
Date TakenJun 30, 2004
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
Despite the late date in the season, several caddisfly larvae remain on the rocks in this river.  In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies). From the Neversink River in New York.
Despite the late date in the season, several caddisfly larvae remain on the rocks in this river.

In this picture: Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies).
Date TakenSep 5, 2006
Date AddedOct 3, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
Here's a school of creek chubs. From Salmon Creek in New York.
Here's a school of creek chubs.
Date AddedJan 25, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
This simple rubber-legged foam beetle is one of my favorite flies for Arctic grayling.  It's quick to tie so I don't mind losing one or two on snags.  It's durable, so one fly can last a hundred fish or more.  It never needs floatant to ride the surface well.  Most importantly, it catches fish, although grayling often hit almost anything.  The bold profile and attention-grabbing plop of the beetle, I think, draw fish from farther away than a more subtle fly might, and it often draws unusually savage strikes. From the Chatanika River in Alaska.
This simple rubber-legged foam beetle is one of my favorite flies for Arctic grayling. It's quick to tie so I don't mind losing one or two on snags. It's durable, so one fly can last a hundred fish or more. It never needs floatant to ride the surface well. Most importantly, it catches fish, although grayling often hit almost anything. The bold profile and attention-grabbing plop of the beetle, I think, draw fish from farther away than a more subtle fly might, and it often draws unusually savage strikes.
StateAlaska
Date TakenAug 6, 2011
Date AddedAug 7, 2011
AuthorTroutnut
CameraCanon PowerShot D10
Underwater Photo Page:1234...25
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