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> > The pectinated spines of Heptageniidae sp.



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BrookymanDecember 18th, 2012, 5:26 pm
Banned
Posts: 797
Hi Kurt

As I notice more styles I will continue to make charts that maybe
of use to me and others. Actually almost ever sample I dissect
I do these water color painting illustrations of all important
anatomical keys and more.

I started it to help me record data on all species. Because many previous illustration are vague in the fine details sometimes needed to make a good decision at least for me. To tell you the true if I could have opportunity to do illustrations for the pro's that would be a honor.


So far the program works like this example on maxillae crowns only.

Stenacron & Heptagenia sp use style [ d ]
Maccaffertium uses mostly style [ C & A ]
Stenonema uses style [ b ].

Every M luteum I dissected has only 3 of style "B" every time.

This may mean nothing in the end, it will take comparisons of
hundred of samples. This may only be a geographical thing. Ether
way I am having my fun.


Mack.
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TaxonDecember 19th, 2012, 5:18 am
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1296
Hi Mack,

Your great illustrations notwithstanding, I believe the term for a structure having projections resembling the teeth of a comb is correctly spelled as pectinated.
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
EntomanDecember 19th, 2012, 12:07 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Also, though papers often refer to these parts on the maxilla as "pectinated spines", I'm not sure that is technically correct... At least from the standpoint of categorizing spine types.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
TaxonDecember 21st, 2012, 4:28 am
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1296
Hey Mack, where the heck are you? Don't you even consider abandoning us. Without you, there simply wouldn't be anyone to stimulate the required level of interesting conversation. Am I right, or am I right?
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
BrookymanDecember 21st, 2012, 9:59 pm
Banned
Posts: 797
WOW Hey Roger.

Thank you I will always try to stimulate our learning curve. :)

Actually I was getting bad muscle cramps in my shoulder..To much
mouse clicking..With me being able to work at this get hobby allot
like 10 hours or more a day, that's a lot of mouse clicks when you
are looking through photos.

Thank you also for mentioning the spelling.

Mack.
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BrookymanDecember 21st, 2012, 10:14 pm
Banned
Posts: 797
Hey Kurt

That's the term Lewis used in 74. But by the time biosystematics came around
they were being referred as pectinated comb's. I am still trying to move
to that from pectinated spines.

I am glad that you guys like the illustrations I really enjoy doing them.
I am slowly doing illustrations for Ephemerella subvaria or the dark hendrixson I did the pronotum/wingpad & the maxillae so far. I tend to
work on 10 different projects at a time to keep me from getting tried of looking at one thing.


BTW Merry Christmas to all my friend here at Troutnut.

Mack
Banned for threatening another user and then trying to circumvent a kinder "soft" ban with fake accounts
EntomanDecember 22nd, 2012, 4:21 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
That's the term Lewis used in 74.

Yes, and others as well. I didn't mean to insinuate you were wrong in using the term, only that for purposes of your diagram classifications, I don't know if I would group these with the spine types. IMO, they are "tooth like" setae, but maybe I'm wrong.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
BrookymanDecember 22nd, 2012, 5:22 pm
Banned
Posts: 797
Hey Kurt.

You know, I was thinking !! That as a RULE we all follow Biosystematics as a
major source of key's to the identifications of the former Stenonema
group. So we mid as well follow it with the other terminologies.

I am not sure that teeth is right ?? I say that only because the mandibles are the major grinding components of the mouth parts, and the maxillae are more for brushing & inserting food debris into the mandibles for grinding.

And with that said I could be wrong too. After browse reading several papers on the feeding process of Heptageniidae larva. That is how I believe it to work. But misunderstanding is always plausible..

Mack.
Banned for threatening another user and then trying to circumvent a kinder "soft" ban with fake accounts
EntomanDecember 22nd, 2012, 6:18 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
I am not sure that teeth is right ??

Me either. I just used the word "tooth" in the analogous sense. Pectinated or comb-like setae is probably the correct classification. I'm not sure why they are referred to as spines in some papers.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
BrookymanDecember 22nd, 2012, 7:32 pm
Banned
Posts: 797
YA that is a good point Kurt. I am going to reffer to them as

" Pectinated setae combs " mostly because they are replacements
of setae in there usage. I am strongly reviewing the usage of them
as a environmental anomaly. All species that use them tend to live in quiet
waters with heavy weed growth. Even though they apparently are designed
for the gathering & brushing process, McCafferty stated that the gut of
Stenacron Interpunctaum had diatoms of plants in there gut
but mostly mineral and debris particles.

Regarding Stenacron Interpunctaum:
That to me that says they can and do prefer warmer, slower,
and very fertile environments as I am finding and that is
their biological niche ??? I am curious as to the data I will compile
on them. I will rear at least 100 this spring and I have 6 "strains"
to study from. WOW that is a lot of photos.!!!

I think that the term spines should be reserved for
the projections of the abdomen region as a secondary
description, as we have read in the past with other
papers.


Mack.
Banned for threatening another user and then trying to circumvent a kinder "soft" ban with fake accounts
EntomanDecember 22nd, 2012, 8:36 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
I think that the term spines should be reserved for the projections of the abdomen region...

I wouldn't go that far. That will really mess you up, especially when working with the Ephemerellidae (Spiny Crawlers). They can be all over the body. The issue isn't location, it's projection type. Remember what I wrote in your setae topic regarding spines:

Many can look similar to setae, but they lack a cuticular joint and are actually outgrowths of the cuticula (chitinous surface layer of the body), similar to nodules and tubercles. Some look as the name implies, others look like tiny hairs. It can be confusing because some of these character names have their metaphors mixed, depending on the authors use of terms. Tiny spines are often referred to as "fixed hairs" and large spiky setae are often referred to as "spines" or "spine-like setae."
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
BrookymanDecember 22nd, 2012, 8:50 pm
Banned
Posts: 797
Ya very true..
Banned for threatening another user and then trying to circumvent a kinder "soft" ban with fake accounts

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