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The Specimen

The Discussion

VTBobJune 2nd, 2009, 8:17 pm
Posts: 1Great info and photos. Fishing Catskills for first time, didn't know what a blue quill was. Looks like an #18, will a sparkle dun tie work?
WbranchJune 2nd, 2009, 11:39 pm
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2506
Typically the emergence period for Paraleps (Blue Quills) has been over for at least three weeks in the Catskills. Any #16 - #18 fly with brownish gray body, slate gray wings, and dun hackle will work.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
MayflyJune 3rd, 2009, 7:51 pm
santacruz argentina

Posts: 3
This insect is a key to bearing in mind at the moment of working an imitation of this boss can obtain a good day of fishing.
A fly of greyish tonalities with blue variations can guarantee a good imitation of this efhemeroptero
Entomology
GONZOJune 4th, 2009, 1:18 pm
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
Bob,

Although Matt (Wbranch) is right about the early season Blue Quill (Paraleptophlebia adoptiva) emergence being well past, the Summer Blue Quills will hatch from now into the fall. All of the Eastern Blue Quill duns look about the same and are similar in size (about #16-18), but some of the summer (actually late spring to fall) species have very distinctive male spinners. Unlike the brown-bodied male spinners of the early season adoptiva, these have what fly fishers describe as the "Jenny Spinner" coloration: a brown thorax and whitish abdomen with a brown tip. The females have brown bodies. Look for the duns to emerge in side pockets, stream edges, and eddies from late morning into early afternoon.
WbranchApril 10th, 2012, 1:39 am
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2506
Gonzo,

Is the summer "Blue Quill" a Paraleptophlebia adoptiva or does it have another name?
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
TaxonApril 10th, 2012, 4:45 am
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1295
Gonzo,
Is the summer "Blue Quill" a Paraleptophlebia adoptiva or does it have another name?

Hi Matt,

Don't believe Gonzo has been tuned in for about six months, so I'll attempt to field your question for him. The summer-emerging Blue Quills are not P. adoptiva.

Here are the Paraleptophlebia species present in PA, and their approximate emergence date ranges:

P. adoptiva (Spring - Mar thru mid-May)
P. assimilis (don't know)
P. debilis (Summer - Jun thru mid-Aug)
P. moerens (Spring - late Apr thru mid-May)
P. mollis (Summer - Jun thru mid-Aug)
P. strigula (Summer - Jun thru mid-Aug)

Best,

Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
GutcutterApril 10th, 2012, 7:16 am
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Matt
The Jenny Spinners in my neck of the woods emerge just before trico season starts and then starts to taper off towards the peak of the tricos.
They begin to hatch an hour or so after the last trico falls, so there is some time to get out of the water to pee and have another two cups of coffee before they start.
I have found them usually emerging from fast water very close to the edge, and Bruce picks up a lot swinging nymphs and wets there while I fumble around trying to look like I know what I'm doing while he makes fun of me.
The size 20 duns look huge compared to the tricos, and the fish smack dun and emerger patterns in this fast water.
I personally have never found rising fish during a spinnerfall, but hope spring eternal...
The spinners have what looks like a clear/transparent abdomen, and are quite a beautiful mayfly.

From a previous thread that I have saved:
According to Edmunds, the females will mate more than once and often proceed to shoreline foliage when finished with ovipositing as opposed to dying spent on the water. The males start the swarms first, often well before. They are often observed along the shoreline dipping from six to two feet and rising again. On occasion, many males for unknown reasons drop to the water at this time and become trapped in the meniscus. When the females finally arrive, they join them quickly at the top, copulate during the four foot fall, and just as quickly make short dives to either dip their abdomens into the water or land on the water to lay their eggs. Then it's up and back at it until they're finished. Edmunds reports that they will repeat this cycle as many as three times before they occasionally die spent on the water or more often head back to the bushes. This is good information for the angler to note.


I have tied some spent and sunken spinners with extended monofilament abdomens in the hopes of finding this activity, but sadly I haven't been so lucky.
I'm probably fumbling around again because when I start to see the spinner dance, the tiny olives start to come off and, well, you know about me and my attempts to break Marinaro's curse...
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
WbranchApril 10th, 2012, 7:43 am
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2506
Hi Tony,

I'm wondering if this other than P. adoptiva is even an important emergence on the Delaware system. I don't seem to ever remember seeing any of these little mayflies. Maybe the emergence is during heavier other more common, to me, hatches and I just don't notice them. I can say with 100% candor that I'd never heard of this fly until I saw the thread on this forum. Therefore I don't think I need to concern myself with tying any more flies.
Thanks for the info though.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
GutcutterApril 10th, 2012, 8:05 am
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Therefore I don't think I need to concern myself with tying any more flies.
Thanks for the info though.


Matt
When we are on your beloved Delaware and I don't have a fly to match anything in the smorgasbord of stuff coming off the water, you supply the fly.
When we're on one of my spring creeks and the Jenny's come off, I'll supply the flies.
Deal?
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
MartinlfApril 10th, 2012, 8:21 am
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 2919
Matt, I'm sure you're right about the Delaware. I'd guess that Tony and Bruce are finding P. mollis (the summer BQ) in several central PA spring creeks where they fish Trico hatches. Personally, I've never seen a fishable hatch of P. mollis, though several fishing buddies in addition to Bruce and Tony tell me they have. I have seen a few of these bugs coming off in PA streams, one morning in particular on the Little Lehigh after a Trico hatch, but there were not enough to get the fish keyed in to them, and I didn't even think of trying to imitate the bug then. The spinners are known for fooling people into thinking they are Tricos, though they have a more up and down motion, and they never, never seem to fall on most waters, just fade away, as per Tony's post above. One buddy does fish the spinner fall, on a stream that he'd prefer I not name here, but it seems to have lots of P. mollis, and enough of the males must hit the water (again, see Tony's post--Edmunds' observations) to bring fish up.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
WbranchApril 10th, 2012, 8:59 am
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2506
Tony,

You must be having a light surgery schedule today to be reading, and responding, to these posts!

"When we are on your beloved Delaware and I don't have a fly to match anything in the smorgasbord of stuff coming off the water, you supply the fly.
When we're on one of my spring creeks and the Jenny's come off, I'll supply the flies.
Deal?"

Okay, that sounds like a plan - when I'm in the boat I not only bring my vest but my boat bag with at least another 1000 flies.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
GutcutterApril 10th, 2012, 10:16 am
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470

You must be having a light surgery schedule today to be reading, and responding, to these posts!


Matt
Tuesday is office day (and Troutnut day)

:)
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
CrepuscularApril 10th, 2012, 10:53 am
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 919
For me the P. mollis is kind of a mystery. I see tons of them(spinners) on Penns, Big Fishing Creek etc, but don't see many on the water, but I have have been VERY successful fishing the spinner on Penns, go figure.
PaulRobertsApril 10th, 2012, 11:44 am
Colorado

Posts: 1776
The heaviest mollis emergences I've seen were on the Cortland NY area stream called "Factory Brook" -which is actually the closest thing to a "spring creek" in the area, being mostly groundwater fed. I've seen the spinners too, but never a "fall".
GutcutterApril 10th, 2012, 7:52 pm
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
For me the P. mollis is kind of a mystery. I see tons of them(spinners) on Penns, Big Fishing Creek etc, but don't see many on the water, but I have have been VERY successful fishing the spinner on Penns, go figure.


Eric
One of the streams that you mention (and one that you haven't) has a great P. mollis hatch in certain sections, and I have done very well with duns and emergers in July. The rising fish can be difficult to spot if you're not looking in the right places.
Some of my spinner frustration has been on this particular stream, but the hatch can be very rewarding to fish. I fish tricos from dawn until the fall has tapered off, then go to this stream around 10 to fish the blue quills.
PM me for more info if you're interested.
Tony
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
TroutnutApril 10th, 2012, 8:04 pm
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2545
The heaviest mollis emergences I've seen were on the Cortland NY area stream called "Factory Brook" -which is actually the closest thing to a "spring creek" in the area, being mostly groundwater fed. I've seen the spinners too, but never a "fall".


This one came from fairly close to there. I've got some pictures of that creek and a Paralep spinner here:

http://www.troutnut.com/trout-fly-fishing-stream/61/Factory-Brook-New_York-pictures

The spinner doesn't have a species ID yet. Anyone want to take a crack at it?
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
PaulRobertsApril 10th, 2012, 9:58 pm
Colorado

Posts: 1776
Jason, I think I know that stretch. The second image is what I called "The Tunnel" and there were some decent fish in there. The first image is just above and I called it "The Montana" for its open skies and meadowed banks lined with spruce.
EntomanApril 10th, 2012, 10:32 pm
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Jason -

Based on the pale longitudinal forewing veins (excepting the costals), dark middle terga, and especially the genitalia (Burks '53), your link is P. adoptiva. I moved the specimen and copied this info there without starting a new topic.

"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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