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Mayfly Genus Epeorus (Little Maryatts)

Taxonomic Navigation -?-
Species in EpeorusNumber of SpecimensNumber of Pictures
Epeorus albertaePink Lady730
Epeorus deceptivus18
Epeorus fragilis00
Epeorus frisoni426
Epeorus grandis214
Epeorus longimanusSlate Brown Dun35
Epeorus pleuralisQuill Gordon542
Epeorus punctatus00
Epeorus suffusus00
Epeorus vitreusSulphur1562

9 species aren't included.
Common Names
Pictures Below

This is page 4 of specimens of Epeorus. Visit the main Epeorus page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Epeorus.
  • 9 underwater pictures of Epeorus.

Pictures of 47 Mayfly Specimens in the Genus Epeorus:

Specimen Page:1...3456
Epeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly NymphEpeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly Nymph View 3 PicturesI suspect this is an Epeorus vitreus nymph. At the current instar (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.), it's tough to make out the pair of dots on the tergites (
One tergite of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
One tergite of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
Tergite: The top (dorsal) part of a single segment on an insect's abdomen when it consists of a single chitinous plate (sclerite), or an individual sclerite if the segment has more than one.
)
which signify that species, but with zooming and contrast enhancement they become evident.
Collected January 13, 2004 from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Epeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly NymphEpeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly Nymph View 3 PicturesKey features I discerned with a microscope include that the femoral flange is blunt (later note: on nymphs of this size, it's somewhat ambiguous and the femora (
The femur of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
The femur of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
Femur: The main segment of an insect's leg close to the body, in between the tibia and the trochanter.
)
can be damaged in the collection process), the postero-lateral (Lateral: To the side.) spines have a longer anterior (Anterior: Toward the front of an organism's body. The phrase "anterior to" means "in front of."), the first gill is not extended, all gills are tracheated, and the femora (
The femur of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
The femur of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
Femur: The main segment of an insect's leg close to the body, in between the tibia and the trochanter.
)
have a distinctive brown spot on the center while all the other spots are gray.
Collected February 7, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Epeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly NymphEpeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly Nymph View 2 Pictures
Collected February 7, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Epeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly NymphEpeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly Nymph View 2 Pictures
Collected February 7, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Epeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly NymphEpeorus vitreus (Sulphur) Mayfly Nymph View 2 PicturesKey features I discerned with a microscope include that the femoral flange is blunt (again, given the other features and location, I probably misread this one), postero-lateral (Lateral: To the side.) spines with the anterior (Anterior: Toward the front of an organism's body. The phrase "anterior to" means "in front of.") longer, and the first gill is not extended.
Collected February 7, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Male Epeorus frisoni Mayfly DunMale Epeorus frisoni  Mayfly Dun View 2 PicturesI collected this male dun together with a female spinner, a female dun, and another male dun. I photographed this bedraggled one, larger than the other male, to show some of the greatest size variation within the species.
Collected September 6, 2006 from Mystery Creek #23 in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on October 3, 2006
Specimen Page:1...3456
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