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Mayfly Genus Eurylophella (Chocolate Duns)

Taxonomic Navigation -?-
Species in EurylophellaNumber of SpecimensNumber of Pictures
Eurylophella bicolorChocolate Dun00
Eurylophella funeralisChocolate Dun00
Eurylophella lutulentaChocolate Dun00
Eurylophella temporalisChocolate Dun19

10 species aren't included.
Common Name
MatchCommon Name
***Chocolate Duns
Pictures Below

This is page 3 of specimens of Eurylophella. Visit the main Eurylophella page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Eurylophella.

Pictures of 22 Mayfly Specimens in the Genus Eurylophella:

Specimen Page:123
Eurylophella (Chocolate Duns) Mayfly NymphEurylophella (Chocolate Duns) Mayfly Nymph View 3 PicturesThis nymph is an extremely early instar (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.).
Collected February 7, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Eurylophella (Chocolate Duns) Mayfly NymphEurylophella (Chocolate Duns) Mayfly Nymph View 2 PicturesIt has the segment 4 gill and abdominal segment 9 is longer than segment 8. I couldn't see abdominal tubercles (
A few (not all) of the abdominal tubercles on this Ephemerella needhami nymph are circled.  They are especially large in this species.
A few (not all) of the abdominal tubercles on this Ephemerella needhami nymph are circled. They are especially large in this species.
Tubercle: Various peculiar little bumps or projections on an insect. Their character is important for the identification of many kinds of insects, such as the nymphs of Ephemerellidae mayflies.
)
, but they may not yet be developed in such an early instar (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.).
Collected March 10, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 19, 2006
Specimen Page:123
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