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Insect Order Ephemeroptera (Mayflies)

Pictures Below

This is page 3 of specimens of Ephemeroptera. Visit the main Ephemeroptera page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Ephemeroptera.
  • 67 underwater pictures of Ephemeroptera.
  • 2 streamside pictures of Ephemeroptera.

Pictures of 753 Mayfly Specimens:

Specimen Page:1234...76
Female Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly SpinnerFemale Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olives) Mayfly Spinner View 12 PicturesThis species is probably in Centroptilum, Cloeon, or Procloeon. I captured this spinner on the same night as a dun which is probably of the same species.
Collected August 9, 2006 from the West Branch of Owego Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on August 11, 2006
Male Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly DunMale Epeorus (Little Maryatts) Mayfly Dun View 12 PicturesI hoped this dun would molt into a spinner for a positive ID, but it didn't. My best guess is Epeorus dulciana, but that's only because that's the smallest western Epeorus species, and this specimen is smaller than any of the others, with a body length of 5.3 mm (although it would be longer as a spinner) and a wing length of 8.5 mm.

It was collected at the same time as a similar-sized female dun.
Collected July 5, 2017 from the South Fork Sauk River in Washington
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on July 6, 2017
Male Rhithrogena virilis Mayfly SpinnerMale Rhithrogena virilis  Mayfly Spinner View 12 PicturesI'm fairly sure this is a specimen of Rhithrogena virilis based on closeup examination of the reproductive anatomy under the microscope (not shown in photos). The other other species of Rhithrogena this large is Rhithrogena flavianula, but the key in Needham's Biology of Mayflies mentions annulation in the abdomen (visible in some images on bugguide.net) more distinct than that on this specimen.

The body and front wing were both about 15.5 mm long, while the cerci (Cercus: The left and right "tails" of an insect are known as the cerci or caudal cerci. The middle tail of a three-tailed insect is not.) were 40 mm long.
Collected July 5, 2017 from the South Fork Sauk River in Washington
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on July 6, 2017
Female Drunella tuberculata Mayfly DunFemale Drunella tuberculata  Mayfly Dun View 14 PicturesI don't know for sure that this is Drunella tuberculata, but that's my best guess for now.

It certainly has a different look and much more robust body shape from Drunella lata duns I photographed a couple weeks earlier, so I doubt it's that species. Using distribution records to eliminate other choices narrows this down to Drunella tuberculata or Drunella walkeri.

Markings described for the abdominal sternites (
One sternite of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
One sternite of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
Sternite: The bottom (ventral) part of a single segment on an insect's abdomen.
)
of the male spinner of Drunella tuberculata are suspiciously similar to those on this female dun. Also, this dun is 9.5mm long (my ruler pic isn't very good, but I'm basing this on measuring the real thing). The size range given in the old Allen & Edmunds keys for walkeri females is 7-8mm, while tuberculata is 9-11mm. For these reasons I'm sticking it in tuberculata for now.

This is the only Drunella mayfly I saw all day. I scooped it off the water as it emerged at around 7pm from a big Catskill tailwater.
Collected June 1, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on June 8, 2007
Male Cinygmula (Dark Red Quills) Mayfly SpinnerMale Cinygmula (Dark Red Quills) Mayfly Spinner View 11 PicturesI'm unsure of the ID on this one; keys put it closest to Cinygmula reticulata, but I'm very doubtful of the species and not positive on the genus. Epeorus is another possibility, but I don't know which species it would be.

This one was collected in association with a female dun probably of the same species.
Collected July 1, 2017 from the South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on July 2, 2017
Male Paraleptophlebia (Blue Quills and Mahogany Duns) Mayfly SpinnerMale Paraleptophlebia (Blue Quills and Mahogany Duns) Mayfly Spinner View 15 PicturesI wasn't actually fishing the river where I caught this one. I was just scouting, didn't like the look of the water, and as I was walking back to the car this little dun landed on my vest. Why can't they all be so easy to collect?
Collected September 8, 2006 from the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on October 4, 2006
Specimen Page:1234...76
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