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Insect Order Plecoptera (Stoneflies)

Pictures Below

This is page 4 of specimens of Plecoptera. Visit the main Plecoptera page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Plecoptera.
  • 6 underwater pictures of Plecoptera.

Pictures of 117 Stonefly Specimens:

Specimen Page:1...345...13
Sweltsa (Sallflies) Stonefly NymphSweltsa (Sallflies) Stonefly Nymph View 6 Pictures
Collected May 13, 2007 from the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Female Perlesta (Golden Stones) Stonefly AdultFemale Perlesta (Golden Stones) Stonefly Adult View 9 PicturesThis stonefly species was the most common insect over the small stream I fished one August afternoon; I saw dozens in their egg-laying flights.
Collected August 24, 2006 from Enfield Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on August 27, 2006
Tallaperla (Roachflies) Stonefly NymphTallaperla (Roachflies) Stonefly Nymph View 6 PicturesThis is the first specimen of the Peltoperlidae stonefly family that I've collected. It's very small and probably an early instar (Instar: Many invertebrates molt through dozens of progressively larger and better-developed stages as they grow. Each of these stages is known as an instar. Hard-bodied nymphs typically molt through more instars than soft-bodied larvae.), but I'm not choosy about new bugs.
Collected April 19, 2006 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 21, 2006
Alloperla (Sallflies) Stonefly AdultAlloperla (Sallflies) Stonefly Adult View 6 PicturesThis specimen was completely green when I collected it from among many others gathered on a midstream rock along with their nymphal shucks (
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Shuck: The shed exoskeleton left over when an insect molts into its next stage or instar. Most often it describes the last nymphal or pupal skin exited during emergence into a winged adult.
)
early in the morning. There was also a yellow one with them, which I assumed was a different species. Now that I've seen how this one started changing from green to yellow, I have to wonder if they weren't the same species and the yellow one was just older.
Collected May 29, 2007 from Brodhead Creek in Pennsylvania
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on June 4, 2007
Female Strophopteryx fasciata (Mottled Willowfly) Stonefly AdultFemale Strophopteryx fasciata (Mottled Willowfly) Stonefly Adult View 4 PicturesSeveral stoneflies of this species were the first adult insects I found in 2004 when I started this site. The hatch was sparse but lasted a good part of the day, and I noted a few good rises despite the early season cold. They ended up struggling on the water's surface fairly often.
Collected March 16, 2004 from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Specimen Page:1...345...13
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