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Insect Order Trichoptera (Caddisflies)

Pictures Below

This is page 4 of specimens of Trichoptera. Visit the main Trichoptera page for:

  • The behavior and habitat of Trichoptera.
  • 55 underwater pictures of Trichoptera.

Pictures of 96 Caddisfly Specimens:

Specimen Page:1...345...11
Cheumatopsyche (Little Sister Sedges) Caddisfly PupaCheumatopsyche (Little Sister Sedges) Caddisfly Pupa View 10 PicturesThis is the first fully formed caddis pupa (technically, a pharate adult (Pharate adult: Caddisflies are considered to be pupae during their transformation from larva into adult. This transformation is complete before they're ready to emerge. The emerging insect we imitate with the "pupa" patterns we tie is technically called a pharate adult. It is a fully-formed adult caddisfly with one extra layer of exoskeleton surrounding it and restricting its wings.)) that I've collected and photographed alive and healthy. I'll put a video of this specimen online soon, too.
Collected April 14, 2007 from Cayuta Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on April 22, 2007
Lepidostoma (Little Brown Sedges) Little Brown Sedge LarvaLepidostoma (Little Brown Sedges) Little Brown Sedge Larva View 6 PicturesThis one got a little bit damaged in the abdomen when I extracted it from its case. That's a delicate job.
Collected May 6, 2007 from Mongaup Creek in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on May 18, 2007
Theliopsyche (Little Brown-Green Sedges) Little Brown Sedge AdultTheliopsyche (Little Brown-Green Sedges) Little Brown Sedge Adult View 5 PicturesThis one has a neat iridescent sheen to its wings.

See the discussion for details on this fly's tentative ID.
Collected May 28, 2007 from Mystery Creek #42 in Pennsylvania
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on June 4, 2007
Phryganeidae Caddisfly LarvaPhryganeidae  Caddisfly Larva View 5 PicturesThis "specimen" is actually two caddis larvae fighting each other over a case. The case is a hollow tube; one larva would go in the back end, presumably bite the other, and chase it out. The invader crawled forward into the case while the other one fled, and then it went around to the back and bit the first one. They did this several times, and I recorded it on video.
Collected March 1, 2004 from unknown in Wisconsin
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25, 2006
Specimen Page:1...345...11
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