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Updates from June 1, 2007

Photos by Troutnut from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York

This fish almost got me into the coveted "20/20 club."  It's a 20 inch brown caught on sulphur-flavored Galloup's Cripple tied on a size 18 3X-fine dry fly hook.  It's also my biggest fish to date from the Catskills. From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
This fish almost got me into the coveted "20/20 club." It's a 20 inch brown caught on sulphur-flavored Galloup's Cripple tied on a size 18 3X-fine dry fly hook. It's also my biggest fish to date from the Catskills.
Date TakenJun 1, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi
 From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
Date TakenJun 1, 2007
Date AddedJun 5, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi

On-stream insect photos by Troutnut from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York

I didn't manage to collect a nymph, but here's the hollow shuck left over from an emerged dun, showing the basic pattern of the nymph.  In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemera guttulata (Green Drake). From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York.
I didn't manage to collect a nymph, but here's the hollow shuck (
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Shuck: The shed exoskeleton left over when an insect molts into its next stage or instar. Most often it describes the last nymphal or pupal skin exited during emergence into a winged adult.
)
left over from an emerged dun, showing the basic pattern of the nymph.

In this picture: Mayfly Species Ephemera guttulata (Green Drake).
Date TakenJun 1, 2007
Date AddedJun 4, 2007
AuthorTroutnut
CameraPENTAX Optio WPi

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York

Female Ephemera guttulata (Green Drake) Mayfly DunFemale Ephemera guttulata (Green Drake) Mayfly Dun View 16 PicturesIt's about time I got a green drake on this site!
Collected June 1, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on June 4, 2007
Ephemerella needhami (Little Dark Hendrickson) Mayfly DunEphemerella needhami (Little Dark Hendrickson) Mayfly Dun View 7 PicturesSee the comments for an interesting discussion of the identification of this dun.
Collected June 1, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on June 4, 2007
Female Drunella tuberculata Mayfly DunFemale Drunella tuberculata  Mayfly Dun View 14 PicturesI don't know for sure that this is Drunella tuberculata, but that's my best guess for now.

It certainly has a different look and much more robust body shape from Drunella lata duns I photographed a couple weeks earlier, so I doubt it's that species. Using distribution records to eliminate other choices narrows this down to Drunella tuberculata or Drunella walkeri.

Markings described for the abdominal sternites (
One sternite of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
One sternite of this Isonychia bicolor mayfly spinner is highlighted in red.
Sternite: The bottom (ventral) part of a single segment on an insect's abdomen.
)
of the male spinner of Drunella tuberculata are suspiciously similar to those on this female dun. Also, this dun is 9.5mm long (my ruler pic isn't very good, but I'm basing this on measuring the real thing). The size range given in the old Allen & Edmunds keys for walkeri females is 7-8mm, while tuberculata is 9-11mm. For these reasons I'm sticking it in tuberculata for now.

This is the only Drunella mayfly I saw all day. I scooped it off the water as it emerged at around 7pm from a big Catskill tailwater.
Collected June 1, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on June 8, 2007
Female Penelomax septentrionalis Mayfly DunFemale Penelomax septentrionalis  Mayfly Dun View 10 PicturesI'm confident this dun belongs to septentrionalis, because her legs are just too long for any other Ephemerellid, and her unusual mid-dorsal (Dorsal: Top.) stripe matches those of two easily identified nymphs I collected some miles downstream.

This really pretty mayfly was in kind of bad shape when I found it crippled on the surface, and bouncing around in my container with a bunch of green drakes didn't help.
Collected June 1, 2007 from the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on June 4, 2007

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