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Updates from August 14, 2004

Photos by Troutnut from Devil's Creek and Miscellaneous Wisconsin in Wisconsin

This is a classic small freestone brookie stream. From Devil's Creek (Rusk County) in Wisconsin.
This is a classic small freestone brookie stream.
Date TakenAug 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 18, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
On my way to a favorite brook trout stream, I spotted several sandhill cranes in a Wisconsin farm field. From Rusk County, WI in Wisconsin.
On my way to a favorite brook trout stream, I spotted several sandhill cranes in a Wisconsin farm field.
Date TakenAug 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 18, 2006
AuthorTroutnut
A riffle in a small stream feeds into a deep pool that holds several large brookies. From Devil's Creek (Rusk County) in Wisconsin.
A riffle in a small stream feeds into a deep pool that holds several large brookies.
Date TakenAug 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 18, 2006
AuthorTroutnut

On-stream insect photos by Troutnut from Miscellaneous Wisconsin in Wisconsin

This nighttime flash photograph shows a bunch of Ephoron mayflies flying around during the hatch.  So many of them fly around with their dun shucks attached that it seems like they molt from the dun to spinner stage in mid-air.  Actually they molt on streamside vegetation like other mayflies, but they sometimes take off to mate before they're completely finished.  In this picture: Mayfly Genus Ephoron (White Flies). From unknown in Wisconsin.
This nighttime flash photograph shows a bunch of Ephoron mayflies flying around during the hatch. So many of them fly around with their dun shucks (
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Here's an underwater view of the pupal shucks of several already-emerged Brachycentrus numerosus caddisflies.
Shuck: The shed exoskeleton left over when an insect molts into its next stage or instar. Most often it describes the last nymphal or pupal skin exited during emergence into a winged adult.
)
attached that it seems like they molt from the dun to spinner stage in mid-air. Actually they molt on streamside vegetation like other mayflies, but they sometimes take off to mate before they're completely finished.

In this picture: Mayfly Genus Ephoron (White Flies).
Date TakenAug 14, 2004
Date AddedJan 18, 2006
AuthorTroutnut

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